At least they know how to get on your radar

A person holds up a phone with high-rise buildings in the background.
A person holds up a phone with high-rise buildings in the background.
Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

Over the course of a couple of months, I posted three different articles I’d written on LinkedIn. They were all articles about management that had run in places like Business Insider and Fast Company. I was excited to share some hard-won lessons with my network and hoped that my articles could help other startup founders in a similar position.

After posting the articles, I heard from some people I knew who were glad to see I was writing and who had enjoyed the read. And also? I was hit with an enormous wave of spam.

The spammers came out in…


Entrepreneur-in-Residence Column

It’s probably not the metrics

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

As a tech entrepreneur and startup advisor, I’m often asked for my take on startup issues from fundraising, to team-building, to dealing with difficult people at work. For this week’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence column at EH, I’m replying to a submission from Claire.

Question: At first, I was super excited about a new consulting project. It’s interesting work, and the client team seems cool. The problem? I’m having a weird experience — the harder I work, and the better work I do, the less my client seems to value what I do. I’m crushing all my performance metrics, and delivering high-quality output…


ENTREPRENEUR-IN-RESIDENCE COLUMN

Myth #1: Passion is everything

Photo by Denys Nevozhai on Unsplash

As a tech entrepreneur and startup advisor, I’m often asked for my take on startup issues from fundraising, to team-building, to dealing with difficult people at work. For this week’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence column at EH, I’m replying to a submission from Jason.

Question: I interviewed for a startup that aims to make nutritional counseling available to anyone — a mission I care deeply about. I’m confident I conveyed my passion in my interview, and they were impressed that I had volunteered with nutrition initiatives around the world. Making a difference in the nutrition field is my dream. But I didn’t get…


They will come for you whether you’ve wronged them or not.

Photo credit: @nakaridore via Freepik

A while back, I got a call from Casey out of the blue. I’d met her the year before in New York when I was recruiting for my e-commerce startup. At the time, Casey held a senior level-position at a blue-chip retailer, and was looking for a career change. We didn’t have anything for her, but she and I had gotten along well enough, so I was excited to hear from her again.

“My husband got a massive promotion, so we relocated to LA,” she told me. “We just bought a house in Malibu. I’m looking to get back to…


Entrepreneur-in-Residence column

#1: Oversee less; execute more

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

As a tech entrepreneur and startup advisor with successes, failures, and everything in between, I’m often asked for my take on startup issues from fundraising, to team-building, to dealing with difficult people at work. For this week’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence column at EH, I’m replying to a submission from Jana.

Question from Jana: I just started a job at a wellness startup after 15 years in a big corporation. I asked my boss a question, but she only got back to me days later. When she replied, she asked me what I had learned from R&D, instead of answering my question. I…


Entrepreneur-in-Residence

Don’t say your biggest weakness is perfectionism

Photo by Tamarcus Brown on Unsplash

As an entrepreneur and advisor who has experienced successes, failures, and all manner of in-betweens, I’m often asked for my take on everything from fundraising to team-building, to dealing with difficult people at work. For this week’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence column, I’m doing some myth-busting when it comes to common interview advice, especially for people over thirty.

Reader question from James: I’m 33, and am interviewing at several startups for roles managing an operations team. I just had my first interview after seven years at my last job. When they asked about my biggest weakness, I gave the same answer I gave…


Column: Entrepreneur-in-Residence

And what to ask instead

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

As a tech entrepreneur and startup advisor with successes, failures, and everything in between, I’m often asked for my take on startup issues from fundraising, to team-building, to dealing with difficult people at work. For this week’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence column at EH, I’m replying to a submission from Anna.

Reader question from Anna: “I have an interview with a startup coming up. What kinds of questions can I ask that will impress my interviewer?”

The biggest mistake people make in the “Do you have any questions for me?” portion of the interview is asking lazy questions.

The first thing to understand…


Letting authenticity go is where true freedom begins.

Photo by Aditya Saxena on Unsplash

“Sophia” was one of the strongest creative people I’d worked with, and the best curator my e-commerce company had ever seen. Though she only had a few years' experience, her talent in assembling interior design collections on budget and on brand blew me away. She commanded a rare combination of skills: impeccable taste, a dogged work ethic, and superb organization. Her responsibilities grew quickly. Within four months, we promoted her twice. And in another six, she might have been running the whole merchandising operation.

The problem? She left after only four months — just as she was starting to hit…


The worst kind of takers disguise themselves as givers

Photo credit: Tima Miroshnichenko via Pexels

It was after midnight when my phone rang. It was my friend Mattie. She was in the middle of a crisis involving a family business, a lot of money, and some lawyers, and she needed to talk. This was going to be a marathon call, so I put on some tea, cracked a window, and closed my eyes. I drew a deep, slow breath. Then exhaled.

Alright. I was ready for duty.

“Hey, Mattie. You okay?”

I’d been friends with Mattie for years, and she was always dealing with a crisis. Sometimes parents, sometimes bosses. Once, her cat was boycotting…


Your mentor is not your ride-or-die

Pexels

Finding a mentor, and building a successful relationship with them, can be frustrating for people searching for someone to provide guidance, offer wisdom, open doors, and course-correct them when they veer off track.

This frustration is compounded by the common, but off-kilter expectations of finding a Tuesdays with Morrie-style relationship. But the romanticized ride-or-die mentor model is not always reality. My entrepreneurial years have seen me through a range of mentorship relationships; some great and some disappointing. One thing I’ve learned is that the first step to successful mentorship is checking your own expectations.

As a two-time founder, I’ve now…

Marina Glazman

Tech entrepreneur, 2x founder, analyzer of people , teams, and culture. Join at glazzie.com

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