Is The Electoral College A Fundamental Pillar Of The U.S. Constitution?

Given the recent election, the insurrection at the Capitol, and the attempted overthrow of electoral college votes at the state level many have written about the electoral college. About a year ago I considered starting a blog about history and government, things I’m really passionate about. So I did what many do, I turned to social media and I asked for suggestions about topics to research and write. One of the first to come up was the electoral college. …


Twelve years ago, I began graduate school in northern Virginia. I was excited, bright-eyed, and hopeful for the future I saw ahead. In my mind, I was studying something that would allow me to make a difference. Less than a year later we were in the midst of The Great Recession. I was unafraid though. I believed that something would work out. As graduation neared and my studies were near completed federal, state, and local governments all began instituting hiring freezes. There was significant competition for any available job. I applied, applied some more, and then kept applying. …


Photo by CDC on Unsplash

The idea for this post started a little more than a week ago. As the Coronavirus outbreak began to intensify here in the United States I posted an article to my Facebook page from ProPublica stressing that a comparison between this virus and the flu is inaccurate. My Facebook feed and conversations with people in my area were showing me that most people were beginning to make this highly inaccurate comparison. I wanted people to understand that this was serious and that we needed to treat the threat appropriately. The response I got was surprising to me, although it probably…


Photo by Hannah Busing on Unsplash

Jean Valjean, in the musical Les Misérables, needed to make a snap decision. After a cart crashed trapping the driver under it Jean Valjean, known for his incredible strength, rescued the driver by lifting the cart off him. This act attracted the attention of Javert, a police constable hunting him since he went into hiding after his parole many years in the past. At this time, he owned a business and was the mayor in the small town he lived. As Javert begins to investigate he finds a man he believes is Jean Valjean. At this moment Valjean could allow…


Learning Through Failure

Prior to winning the 1860 Presidential election, many consider Abraham Lincoln’s life to be full of failures. This isn’t true, but by the time he was 51 he had suffered many setbacks that would shake the confidence of most. He lost several elections at both the state and national levels. His first-ever election in 1832 for the Illinois House of Representatives was a defeat. He then won the next four elections. He lost the Whig Party nomination for the United States House of Representatives in 1844, but then won the nomination and the election in 1846. He…


A single guard stands in front of the Custom House in Boston, Massachusetts. It’s a cold night on March 5, 1770, with snow and ice on the streets. A little after 9:00 in the evening a mob begins forming outside the building. The lone guard is reinforced by eight British soldiers with loaded weapons and bayonets affixed. At some point during the confrontation snowballs and other things are thrown at the soldiers. Words and tensions escalate with calls of “Kill Them! Kill Them!” from the mob and one soldier is knocked to the ground[1]. …

Michael Chaffee

Co-Founder of Bennu Digital Labs LLC; Bookworm; Podcast editor; Writing about history, government, and current events.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store