Still I Rise

Maya Angelou’s poetic verses are masterpieces that deserve to be reflected upon. Over the past year I have had my share of ups and downs as all of us do in life. Yet, the poem Still I Rise by Maya Angelou has inspired in me a sense of peace and control.

The poem begins with a defiance for the thoughts of others. In our modern age apathy reigns with hegemony but it should not be mistaken for a lack of caring of what others think. Often we care too much about what others think of us while we try to suppress our outward insecurity. Yet, Angelou challenges us to not care about the twisted lies others may tell for they are only lies. I think Angelou carefully places the word history in the first line to remind us of our place in it. In day to day interactions what we say and what others say about us will be forgotten in time and often within a few seconds of saying it. Therefore, live your life not with disregard or recklessness but with peace that you will rise above others words.

Though we should not care about what others say we should respect the power of words. Angelou makes no comforting remarks about how hard it is to rise up above the thoughts of others. Ever instance in which she rises comes from a place of hardship. In essences she is saying from the struggles of life comes resilience to its trappings. People must choose to rise and to not let others step on them because only once you rise above will you be free of the noise. Though words, darting looks, and physical chains might hinder the process the ability for one to rise starts in the mind. Words have power but never let them put you in chains.

The poem ends just as it began with a lesson necessary to be free in life. Angelou says three times still I will rise and it is this persistent audacity to overcome that must be instilled to be free. Peace and control can only come once one liberates themselves from their own mental trappings and proclaims to the world no matter what Still I Rise.

The Poem →https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46446/still-i-rise