Alzheimer’s Association of America

The Alzheimer’s Association of America was created to continue the worldwide effort to end Alzheimer’s disease. It is the largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer’s research in the country. One of the main reasons I chose to study this organization is because they connect with such a wide range of people. They work with scientific, academic, government and industry thought-leaders worldwide. The organization says they believe in the value of collaboration and are a catalyst toward the time when there will be disease-modifying treatments, preventive strategies and gold-standard care for all people affected by Alzheimer’s disease (alz.org).

Since 1982 The Alzheimer’s Association has been awarded grants that have helped them grow into the largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer’s research. They have invested over $375 million in more than 2,400 scientific investigations. These investigations help advance understanding about the disease, identify future treatment strategies and further improve knowledge of brain health and disease prevention.

The Alzheimer’s Association has funded some extremely exciting advances in Alzheimer’s research including the development of Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB), the first radiotracer capable of showing beta-amyloid in the living brain during a PET scan. This proves once again that the association is a catalyst to progress in ending this terrible disease.

Since there are no survivors and no cure for the disease, increases in federal research funding is critical to make up for lack of data. Since being founded, the Alzheimer’s Association has filled a prominent role as a nonprofit organization complementing federal and industry initiatives. One of the main points of emphasis from the organization is to ensure that their national policy and research agendas reflect how important the disease is as a leading cause of death and disability, a personally devastating illness, and an emerging health care crisis.

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