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Today, dark grey clouds are threatening overhead and as usual, when the weather feels close, I tend to feel less free. Yesterday was an extremely busy day at work, filming all over the capital. The weather was beautiful and a reminder that Summer is on its way. So why doesn’t it feel like it? Why do I doubt it will ever be present?

I opened my computer up to write on the train because I felt a strong urge to make a point. I am 24 now, I just got a promotion, and I am still relying on my parents to help me. I feel sorry for them — I know they don’t mind or even think about it as much as I do, but I feel like they have already given up so much of their life to putting kids first — that on this grey and depressing day is a metaphor for all of the pressures and worries that an average family must have. That my own parents aspirations are put after mine.

All of the emotions.

I feel very grateful, but I feel really frustrated on their behalf. I SHOULD be able to fly the nest, I should be able to help them kick start their soul food. But I can’t and they can’t. Personally, much like the weather analogy; the socio-political natural disaster; Hurricane ‘Elite’ is ever-looming.

There is a lot of this feeling on a national scale too. Conservatives have been voted in as a majority, never before has 1984 felt so present.

I don’t like how this country feels anymore.

I don’t like not having a voice.

I don’t like that I can’t see the sky

That I can’t dream

That my aspirations are not in sight

Literal over lateral

Yes vs No

The ‘We LOVE your work but we don’t understand what you’ve done here”

The “Just make it less like what you’ve done and more like this”

“Yes this from 8 years ago”

We want to take risks

But actually we’re traditionalists

We want creativity

Oh no

No not

I don’t think so

Thats a risk and I like my job the way it is.

You’d make my job much easier if you didn’t challenge the brief

The status-quo

Just conform

Accept that the vote is what it is and there is nothing that can be done for the next five years.

No.

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