Quality vs. Quantity — which should you focus on?

There’s a never-ending debate between quality and quantity, especially in my worlds of marketing and startups.

It’s hard to have both quality and quantity at the same time; they have an inverse correlation.

The more you do, the lower quality your work will be. The higher quality your work is, the more time it will take for each task, and you’ll complete fewer tasks.

There’s a big debate about quality vs. quantity in the marketing world.

Content creation is a key part of marketing, and many companies try to pump out lots and lots of content so Google can index all of their articles and they’ll be higher on the search rankings. Sometimes this works, but it’s a grind and can cost a lot of time and money.

Then take SEO master Brian Dean. His blog, Backlinko, garners almost 120,000 unique visitors per month and a 7-figure income. And he has only written 32 articles in just over 3 years. That’s less than one blog post per month! He writes super-long articles that have a ton of value. That’s clearly quality over quantity. Not everyone can create these very long, in-depth articles, though.

Now let’s talk about the startup world.

Conventional wisdom says to do one thing and do it well. Hone in on a single problem, research it, perfect it, create a solution for it, and focus, focus, focus.

Then there is this guy who has launched 12 startups in 12 months. He built and tested a bunch of ideas to figure out what had the most potential.

Or there are venture capital firms that make only a few investments per year but focus on industries where they have expertise. Then there is 500 startups, who is playing moneyball and investing in a large number of startups (way more than 500) to diversify and spread out their risk.

It comes down to your particular situation, your mindset, what resources you have, and what you can execute.

I think there are pros and cons to each approach and you have to find the balance of what works for you.

This is day 18 of my experiment to blog for 30 consecutive days.