Why becoming a multi-planet species is a logical necessity

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Photo by Donald Giannatti on Unsplash

The Fermi Paradox

Launched aboard a ULA Delta II heavy lift rocket in 2009, the Kepler space telescope began its mission of searching for other planets within our Milky Way galaxy. Its telescope was trained on a small patch of sky where it continuously monitored the brightness of 156,000 stars. Over the lifespan of its mission, it detected at least 2,662 exoplanets, with more data analysis still ongoing.

Because Kepler could only detect planets whose orbits were aligned such that they periodically passed in front of their host stars, blocking part of their light, careful statistical analysis concluded that there are more planets in the Milky Way than there are stars. …


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Photo by Sanni Sahil on Unsplash

And you thought a missing semicolon was bad…

Bugs are an unavoidable reality when writing software. In the age of vacuum-tube transistors and electromechanical computers, the earliest software bug was a literal insect (a moth) that crawled into the machine and got trapped in a relay. The original account was given by computing pioneer Grace Hopper, though she was not the one to find the moth. The guilty moth was taped to the log book and software errors have been called bugs ever since.

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Courtesy of the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, VA, 1988. — U.S. Naval Historical Center Online Library Photograph NH 96566-KN. Public Domain.

Debugging code can be so painful that entire methodologies and dogmas have emerged around ways of writing code to be more robust against bugs (see test-driven development). …


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Photo by Josh Methven on Unsplash.

These 7 major trends will reshape how we fly

The Covid-19 pandemic struck a major blow to travel markets, hurting airlines in particular, but air travel is expected to recover by 2023. If anything, the pandemic has accelerated certain trends, such as the development of cleaner, more efficient aircraft.

Other, larger trends are at play. The convergence of several technologies, including AI, 3D printing, and virtual reality is driving much of these changes. Behind the scenes, innovators and entrepreneurs have been imagining new ways to fly. This article is an insider’s look into what’s coming down the pipe.

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Photo by asoggetti on Unsplash.

1. More artificial intelligence and automation

There are many good reasons to keep aircraft piloted by humans, chief among these being human general intelligence that can reason about complex emergencies and apply broad training with situational awareness. …

About

Mikhail Klassen

Founder and CTO of Paladin AI, an aerospace startup empowering humans to be better pilots. PhD in computational astrophysics. Data scientist. Author.

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