100 essential facts & figures for thinking about The Future of Advertising

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∞ While digital ad spend continues its relentless growth, much of that growth is coming from mobile. Video is the only desktop format that’s seeing growth, with search and display on the decline. (1/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Search advertising comprises over 50% of all digital ad spending, and one reason for its flattening growth maybe the shift of the discovery process from the open web to within apps. (2/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ By some estimates, 55% of internet users now begin researching products on Amazon instead of Google. (3/3)
[The Economist]

∞ The entire catalog of titles owned by the top 50 traditional media companies, including The Washington Post, Hearst and Condé Nast, probably account for 5% or less of the trillions of digital ad impressions available for sale each day.
[New York Times]

∞ The largest seller of TVs, Samsung, implemented a software update that stuffed ads onto the menu screen of their Smart TVs. Users could opt out of interest-based advertising by tweaking settings, but couldn’t opt out of being served ads. The only way to get rid of the ads is to disconnect the “smart” TV from the Internet.
[Advertising Age]

∞ The Economist currently gets over 65% of its revenues directly from readers, and expects display advertising to vanish by 2025.
[PressGazette]

∞ For the first time, Facebook is giving users control to avoid seeing ads that might upset them. Previously, ad preferences only allowed them to specify topics they wanted to see. Currently, users can turn off alcohol or parenting ads — with other potentially distressing topics to follow if enough people report them.
[Advertising Age]

∞ The single most profitable ad fraud operation yet, nicknamed Methbot, has recently been unearthed. Operated by the Russian cybercriminals using sophistication and scale, Methbot targetted high-value video inventory and was estimated to be siphoning away $3–5 million in ad revenue every day. (1/4)
[Marketing Land]

∞ To pull off the scam, Methbot hacked into regional internet registries to pass off 600,000 counterfeit addresses as legitimate. Subsequently, Methbot posed as a reseller of ad inventory from name-brand media properties — though the ads were actually running on faux websites expressly designed for the purpose. (2/4)
[Adweek]

∞ To generate a monetizable impression of an ad, Methbot was(/is) simulating human behaviour with a ‘bot’ — interrupting the playback using fake cursor movements, using fake social network login information and fake clicks “in a randomly generated fashion to achieve a realistic rate.” (3/4)
[Marketing Land]

∞ Ad fraud is expected to cost the industry $7.2 billion in 2016, up nearly $1 billion from the previous year. (4/4)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Among the top 1,000 mobile apps and mobile sites, mobile sites averaged 3 times as many users as apps and were growing twice as fast. But if usage time is considered, apps still dominate — accounting for 87% of mobile time spent in the U.S. for the last 2 years.
[Digiday]

∞ Snapchat is increasingly being seen as TV-disruptor-in-chief logging over 10 billion daily video views with its mixture of user and publisher-created content interspersed with advertising. While its 2016 revenues are around $350 million, it is widely expected to become a $1 billion business in 2017. (1/4)
[Adweek]

∞ The average television network in the United States reaches around 6% of Americans aged between 18 and 34. Snapchat, on the other hand, reaches 41% of the same demographic. (2/4)
[Forbes]

∞ It’s worth noting that watching content on Snapchat is in many ways analogous to watching TV. Videos run full screen and play with the sound on; stories are designed to feature a narrative and users can flip between them as they do with TV channels. (3/4)
[New York Times]

∞ Snapchat even wants to rework deals with publishers (for its “Discover” section) on a similar model to TV networks buying programming — paying content partners a flat license fee up front and keeping the ad money for itself. (4/4)
[Recode]

∞ A new survey reveals that a significant number of participants (44%) couldn’t correctly identify the sponsor of a native ad they had just read, and a majority (77%) didn’t interpret native ads as advertising, instead believing them to be editorial or hybrid content. About 54% reported feeling deceived upon finding out the truth. (1/3)
[Niemanlab]

∞ A source of confusion is the widespread use of many non-standardized terms by publishers to label and identify native advertising. Even the FTC’s own guidelines — intending to clear the air — offer 17 permissible examples of labeling native ads. However, survey participants found the label ‘Sponsored’ the most helpful disclosure for native advertising, even more than the label ‘advertising’ itself. (2/3)
[Fast Company]

∞ Meanwhile, news outlets like Time, NYT, WaPo & WSJ continue to aggressively pursue ‘branded content’ as a growth driver. These forays by publishers are increasingly pushing in-house content units into the traditional domain of advertising agencies, from offering consulting & research services for companies to making ads that run outside their own websites. (3/3)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ Programmatic direct, where digital media buyers use the ad tech programmatic ecosystem to lock up premium ad inventory ahead of time instead of through real-time bidding, is expected to grow between 150 and 200% yoy in 2016. (1/2)
[Advertising Age]

∞ For advertisers, programmatic direct is a move away from the efficiencies in buying on open exchanges towards making sure ads appear next to the right content in the right environment. (2/2)
[Advertising Age]

∞ An adtech company is experimenting with offering viewers control over the online ads they see — snoozing ads they don’t like, for eg. Rubicon Project currently serves 10 trillion ad impressions each month and believes such viewer participation improves consumer experience while also eliminating wasted impressions.
[Advertising Age]

∞ Global advertising expenditure is expected to grow 4.4% in 2017, the same rate as 2016 but — significantly — without tailwinds from major sporting or political events. (1/3)
[Reuters]

∞ Digital media continues to be the top driver of growth for the worldwide advertising industry hoovering up 72 cents of every incremental ad dollar in 2016, set to rise to 77 cents in 2017; the comparative figures for TV are 21 and 17 cents respectively. (2/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ TV, however, remains the larger medium by global ad spend with 42% share in 2016 and a projected 41% in 2017. In comparison, digital spend is set to increase from 31% in 2016 to 33% in 2017. (3/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Data from Google Ngram Viewer and Google Search Trends suggests that use of the words ‘marketing’ and ‘consumer’ has been in decline after peaking in the early aughts. One extrapolation is that we are now entering a post-marketing era, where we — as users of the Net — are coming to exercise fully both the connections and the agency (ad-blocking, for eg.) this new(ish) medium offers us. Thereby putting even more distance between marketing and the marketplace.
[ART + marketing]

∞ Till date, the maker of Adblock Plus, Eyeo GmbH, have been challenged in court on 6 different occasions arguing that blocking online ads violates German law. The company, based in Germany since its creation, has won all the 6 cases including one bought by Spiegel Online, the online arm of Germany’s best-known media brand — making ad blocking 100% legal. (1/2)
[Ars Technica]

∞ As ad blocking passes the legality test, publishers also have had a partial win. In one case brought up by Axel Springer, Eyeo was ordered to change the way it offered to white-list the publisher’s websites — though the court insisted that Axel Springer or any other publisher would eventually have to comply with Eyeo’s “acceptable ads” criteria to get whitelisted. (2/2)
[Ars Technica]

∞ A pan-European study of FMCG brands and retailers shows that there has been a significant drop in the share of products sold on promotion, particularly in the UK where such activity shifts more volumes than anywhere else. It is expected that much of this reclaimed marketing spend will be directed towards communicating brand benefits through advertising in pursuit of longer-term gains.
[Marketing Week]

∞ A survey among internet users in US and UK adds texture to the relentless rise of ad blocking. The study used tracking pixels to detect ad blocking usage in addition to enquiring about it — revealing a significant gap between the two. While widespread on desktop, actual ad blocking usage on smartphones is still rare (2% in both countries) and is growing more slowly than the overall rate.
[AudienceProject — PDF Link]

∞ A survey revealed that if a political ad immediately preceded a brand ad, the latter was seen as 32% less relevant and brand reputation fell by 35%. The findings were true even for political advertising with positive messages but eliciting negative reactions — suggesting that the emotional responses evoked by political campaigns are difficult for consumers to compartmentalize.
[J. Walter Thompson Intelligence]

∞ In the US, mobile advertising is now beginning to match the performance of desktop advertising in reaching intended audiences — doing so 60% of the time, up from 49% in 2015. Desktop advertising still holds a slight advantage when broader reach is required, mobile being more effective in connecting with narrower audiences. (1/2)
[Nielsen]

∞ In particular, mobile ad campaigns have a clear edge over desktop efforts in reaching women across most age brackets. (2/2)
[Nielsen]

∞ TNT is experimenting reducing ad loads on its new shows yielding 50 to 52 minutes of content per episode with around 8 to 10 minutes of ads. The typical TV show currently runs for 42 minutes out of an hour with the rest being filled with advertising. A moot point however is that similar experiments in the past haven’t resulted in any long-lasting changes in favour of viewers.
[Vox]

∞ Digital natives, while displaying precocious digital fluency, seem to lack the perceptiveness to differentiate between real news and native advertising. More than 80% of school and college students participating in a recent news literacy study misidentified advertising clearly labelled ‘sponsored content’ as a news story. Instead of paying attention to news source, they judged credibility by the amount of detail the story contained or the size of the attached photo.
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ Commuters in Düsseldorf, Germany can now get a single journey train or bus ticket worth €2.60 in exchange for watching four 20-second ad spots on an app. Demand is currently far outsripping supply, all available free tickets finding takers within hours of being on offer each day. The app is currently operating with 2 sponsors but will offer a choice of ads to choose from, when more come on board.
[Citylab]

∞ As online shopping starts to mimic offline shopping — where people start off with broad categories and narrow down choices using visual cues — online ad formats that showcase a series of product images responding to general cues and queries are being developed. Both Google and Facebook are offering retailers ad formats that eschew targeting a user with a single product and instead put together a cluster of product images — usually following the first click — to evince interest and facilitate visual discovery.
[Adweek]

∞ Voice-activated devices like Amazon Echo and Google Home are quietly promising a revolution unseating the default visual nature of advertising. Some brands are currently experimenting with “skills” — spoken instructions from a smart home device on how to clean stains, make cocktails or find a nearby liquor store in response to spoken voice-based queries. One holding company has even launched a stand-alone agency to meld together the creative and technological sides of AI and voice.
[Adweek]

∞ Three, a mobile operator owned by Hutchison Whompoa operating in UK, Italy and other European countries, walked back on its promise of implementing network-level ad blocking. Their trial run announced at the beginning of the year was predicated on the belief that escalating advertising data loads should not be a cost borne by consumers. It withdrew its plans after Google, Ofcom and media owners were “pissed off.”
[Business Insider]

∞ According to Google, the completion rate for the average video ad on mobile devices is 22%; on desktops, it’s 28%. 
[Advertising Age]

∞ Global spending on newspaper print ads is expected to decline by 8.7% in 2016, its biggest drop since the 2008 recession. (1/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ While there are many factors contributing to the accelerated downturn in print’s fortunes, its relative ROI isn’t helping. The average CPM for a full-page ad in a national newspaper is roughly $100. Meanwhile, the average CPM for a broadcast TV ad in prime time that reaches 25- to 54-year-olds is roughly $37. (2/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ There are more than 200,000 posts per month on Instagram that are tagged with “#ad,” “#sp” or “#sponsored”.
[The Economist]

∞ In Mexico City, Uber used sign-carrying drones to advertise its carpooling service to drivers stuck in traffic. Photos of the drones went viral on social media, leading Uber to announce that it was just a one-off tactic. (1/2)
[The Verge]

∞ To operate similar ad-drones on US roads, Uber — or any other company — will have to obtain a federal waiver and face other bureaucratic hurdles. That said, as long as they don’t pose a danger to drivers this may not be illegal under federal law. (2/2)
[Popular Science]

∞ An AI media agency — Blackwood Seven — is promising a 25–50% improvement in effectiveness over media plans managed manually and with “gut feel”. The service harnesses 82 data sources — including both external (YouGov and Weather) and internal (sales information) — to predict the likely outcome of a media plan, allowing it to be optimised in realtime. (1/2)
[Campaign]

∞ Apart from the efficiency gains in media spend, Blackwood Seven is also selling their software as a service (Saas) for a monthly fee. This is in contrast to traditional agencies charging clients a percentage of billings and committing to a volume of ad spend with particular media owners to obtain discounts. (2/2)
[Campaign]

∞ Apple made a foray into search advertising by allowing developers and brands to show ads related to users’ searches in its App Store. Some 25% of app installs originate with organic search. 
[Advertising Age]

∞ An eye-tracking study finds that to receive a “gaze time” of at least 1 second, an online ad needs to be viewable for 26 seconds. For gaze times of 2 and 3 seconds, the ads need to be viewable for 33 and 37 seconds respectively. Current industry guidelines count an ad as viewable if 50% is visible for at least 1 second.
[Campaign]

∞ UK’s Advertising Standards Authority analysed the 25,647 complaints it received in 2015 to reveal that men are likelier than women to complain about irresponsible advertising. Women raised objections to ads they consider to be harmful or offensive (unhealthily thin models for eg.), while men were mainly concerned with misleading ads.
[The Guardian]

∞ Facebook has 4 millions advertisers using its platform to reach consumers. Only 40% of those advertisers are creating ads specifically for mobile.
[Fast Company]

∞ Meanwhile, Instagram surpassed 500,000 advertisers on its platform.
[Campaign]

∞ For comparison, estimates place total advertisers using Google AdWords anywhere between 2.5 and 5 million.
[Quora]

∞ About 24% of the 18–54 year old population in the US believe they will use or probably purchase virtual reality gear over the next year. This segment of early adopters are also above-average consumers of media and heavy-spenders.
[Nielsen]

∞ A forecasting study concludes that the advertising industry will be a key driver of AI revenues by 2025, second only to the consumer products sector. With a 8% share of a $38.8 billion market, that will be a lot human powered decision-making taken out of the equation.
[Tractica]

∞ A german signage company is developing giant monochromatic E-ink panels — known for their miserly use of power and legible screens even in direct sunlight — to be used as billboards on the back of trucks. Powered by GPS & 4G, these rolling billboards will display constantly updated location and context-based ads (McDonald’s 5 kms ahead!) along with information about traffic and weather conditions to a “captive” audience. They are expected to be commercially available mid-2017.
[Gizmodo]

∞ To deliver a seamless multichannel experience, marketers are looking to Identity Graphs to match multiple devices to the single consumer who uses them. Deterministic Identity Graphs use credit card data or login IDs to construct the larger picture; Probabilistic Identity Graphs, meanwhile, incorporate various signals like location and browsing history. 
[Advertising Age]

∞ Condé Nast and IBM are teaming up to bring Watson’s data-crunching abilities to connect the right social media influencers with brands and the audiences they are targeting. Watson crunches 52 attributes while combing through the influencer’s published output to determine fit — it also performs a competitive analysis determining if the influencer has already pitched related products or brands.
[Adweek]

∞ Spending on out-of-home advertising — including stand-alone billboards, ads on various modes of transit and airport ads — has risen for 24 consecutive quarters up from $5.9 billion in 2009 to $7.3 billion in 2015. It is believed that audiences for out-of-home media are increasing as smartphones enable people to be connected wherever they are, allowing them to spend more time outside of home and office.
[New York Times]

∞ A showdown between an AI CD and a human CD to create an effective video spot for breath mints resulted in a clear victory for the latter. Both the challengers’ videos were featured online for about 2 months and the final winner decided by audience vote. (1/2)
[Advertising Age]

∞ The AI-CD, as you may have already guessed, had the assistance of a human team to put the video together. It’s contribution was analyzing past creative work and proposing a general — and mostly abstract — direction for the campaign. (2/2)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Following earlier unsuccessful attempts at providing ad-subsidized mobile phone and data plans, Unlockd — a new startup in Australia — is offering users a discount on their rates if they agree to view ads when they unlock their handset screen. (1/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Unlockd works with over 300 advertisers globally and is taking the service to more countries (It already operates in the UK.) Its model is to license its platform to telecom companies and share the advertising revenue with them. (2/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ In the U.S., Boost Mobile gives Android customers credit on prepaid plans in exchange for watching ads. A typical customer would see 25 to 30 pieces of content or ads a day in return for the lower bill. (3/3)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Investment in ad tech firms peaked in 2011 and has seen significant down tick in the last couple of years. The figures for 2016 are likely to be the lowest funding seen since 2005. (1/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ A primary reason for the drying up of investment dollars in ad tech is tied to business models: ad tech’s “media-based” business model relying on marketers’ fluctuating digital ad spend is seen as less robust, especially when compared to marketing tech’s software-as-a-service model with regular recurring revenues from marketers. (2/2)
[Business Insider]

∞ An Advertising Research Foundation study shows that once a digital banner ad reaches the same person 40 times or more in a month, sales actually decline. 
[Advertising Age]

∞ A computer vision firm GumGum claims to be able to programme any face into its recognition system and subsequently identify a picture of the person when it appears on the internet. It is working with P&G to tracks athletes used in their campaigns — to estimate the coverage they attract and to serve a relevant ad next to the picture.
[The Guardian]

∞ P&G announced a shift away from targeted advertising on Facebook and focusing on broader reach instead. It cited the example of Febreze air freshener — targeting ads at pet owners and large households resulted in stagnating sales; sales rose again when the the campaign was expanded to include anyone over 18.
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ A Kickstarter campaign raised £23,000 to fund the takeover of all 68 ads in a London Tube Station, replacing them with pictures of stray cats. The takeover lasted 2 weeks and aimed to provide a “relaxing, fun and light-hearted” space free from commercial ads.
[BBC]

∞ About 25% of respondents in an influencer survey revealed brands have explicitly asked them not to disclose that they were compensated for their influence.
[Advertising Age]

∞ Facebook wrested back its ability to display ads to users with ad-blockers. It made changes to the way advertising is loaded into its desktop website to make its ad units considerably more difficult for ad blockers to detect. (1/4)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ But Facebook’s isn’t the only one working to one up ad blocking. New technology companies — “anti-ad-blockers” or ad-blocking “revenue recovery” companies — are developing workarounds designed to help publishers counteract ad-blocking. A common tactic is “ad reinsertion”, making ads undetectable to ad blockers. (2/4)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ Another is to fix the user experience for eg. by showing ad-blocking users “magazine-like” ads, which are not animated and do not track users’ behaviors like other online ads. (3/4)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ Eschewing legal or technological solutions, Sweden’s publishers took a different tack. 90% of Swedish publishers came together for a month to block users who use ad blocking — giving them the choice of making small one-off payments to access the content or viewing the content at lower quality. However, this approach is unlikely to work outside of Scandinavia — Sweden’s publishing market is small and it is relatively easy to unite competitors against a common cause. (4/4)
[Digiday]

∞ The Weather Company, a media company acquired by IBM, introduced AI-powered dynamic “Watson Ads” units that people can communicate with. The ad unit is initially displayed alongside content and is customized to the viewer’s location and current weather. Subsequently, viewers can interact with the ad using voice or text asking it natural language questions — “Is this medication right for my son?” for eg — and receive realtime responses. (1/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ IBM also tied up with GM to combine Watson’s cognitive capabilities with GM’s OnStar service to deliver personalized brand messages to drivers using location, weather and vehicle data (number of people in the car, fuel level, etc.) The “cognitive mobility platform” is an opt-in service and will learn the driver’s preferences over time. An open ad marketplace, it is targeting brands in retail, fuel, hospitality, media and entertainment, restaurants and travel. (2/2)
[Advertising Age]

∞ Snapchat has a patent pending on a system to identify objects in pictures and serve brand-sponsored image overlays or filters related to the object. This is the visual equivalent of buying advertising space based on keywords in search engines. The patent also details how companies could bid against different types of objects, similar to search advertising.
[Business Insider]

∞ A comScore study concluded that online advertisements on “premium” websites perform better than those placed on non-premium websites potentially justifying the higher prices. The increased effectiveness — up to 67% more — is attributable to the halo effect of the contextual environment in which these ads are seen. (1/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ The above study demonstrates what advertisers are overlooking with the cheaper audience-centric approach to ad-buying — targeting ads to individual users, regardless of which sites they appear on. Media quality is as a factor determining advertising effectiveness. (2/2)
[The Wall Street Journal]

∞ Thanks to smartphones and tablets, U.S. adults spent an extra hour a day consuming media in 2016 compared with 2015.
[Adweek]

∞ After 2 down years, at this year’s “upfronts” TV networks negotiated double-digit CPM rate increases from advertisers — hikes not won since the end of the last U.S. recession. The gains are expected to come from digital spending, and from TV’s “scatter” market, when advertisers pay for commercials much closer to their air date. 
[Variety]

∞ In 1955, after increasing by more than 60% a year over the last five years, television accounted for nearly 20% of total U.S. media advertising. Today, mobile media accounts for the same share, nearly 20% of total U.S. media spending.
[The Atlantic]

∞ Facebook introduced a new metric called Store Visits allowing retail advertisers to put a number on how many people walk into a store after being exposed to local awareness ads on the social network. It won’t necessarily be a complete picture because conversions will be registered only if users have opted in to location-tracking within Facebook’s app.
[Advertising Age]

∞ A Reuters Institute’s survey found that only 9% of U.S. respondents paid for any online news in the past year. The yearly median payment for online news in the U.S. was $87.48 compared with $116 in the UK and $100 in Switzerland.
[NiemanLab]

∞ Total ad spending in the US, as a share of GDP, has fallen by a third since 2000 — hitting new record post-WW2 lows in each of the past three years. One likely factor is the efficiency gains in industry-wide advertising, driven by digital. (1/2)
[REDEF]

∞ For comparison, over the last 100 years (excluding WW2), US ad spending has remained stable within a 1.1–1.5% band of GDP. It is remarkable because during this period the composition of the US economy underwent tremendous upheaval (from the manufacturing to services) as did the makeup of the population. (2/2)
[REDEF]

∞ Using 2015 (and US) numbers, the gap between mobile attention (the time consumers spend on mobile devices) and mobile advertising (the total advertising spend on mobile) is estimated to be worth more than $20 billion a year.
[The Atlantic]

∞ It seems if YouTube were a TV show, it would rank 354th in the US for audience share. This would be based on the standard TV measure of average audience per minute, instead of the digital views approach which tallies viewership figures based on encounters of even partially visible videos for just 3 seconds. 
[Marketing Week]

∞ About 20% of mobile search queries — on the Google app and on Android devices — are voice searches.
[SearchEngine Land]

∞ As much as 85% of videos on Facebook are now viewed without the sound turned on.
[Digiday]

∞ A study by Thinkbox finds that while TV only accounts for 57.5 per cent of all video viewing by 16- to 24-year-olds, it is responsible for 87.6 per cent of their video advertising viewing. 
[Campaign]

∞ Click-through rates (CTR) for premium native ads are highest on smartphones, 0.38% in comparison with just 0.16% for native ads on desktop computers. 
[Business Insider]

∞ According to benchmark data from DoubleClick, traditional non-native display ads — including banner, rich media, or sponsorship ads that do not take the look and feel of surrounding content — get an average CTR of 0.08%.
[Business Insider]

∞ Brave, a new privacy-focused web browser with built-in ad blocking, is aiming to build a model around paying participating publishers and users for speedier and non-intrusive ads from its own advertising network. Payments will be made in Bitcoin; users who don’t fulfill verification criteria (providing email and phone number) will automatically donate their share of the funds to the sites they frequent. (1/5)
[PC World]

∞ Conversely, Brave also allows users to block all ads and pay websites directly through the browser, again in Bitcoin. (2/5)
[PC World]

∞ There is a catch, however. Brave doesn’t actually have deals with any publishers currently. So any money donated will go into an escrow until such arrangements can be worked and publishers step up to claim their share. Brave explains that between recruiting publishers and building the product, they are focusing on the latter. (3/5)
[WIRED]

∞ It also turns out that “read-it-later” service Readability abandoned precisely such a plan back in 2012 because too few publishers actually claimed their payments. The thing that’s different this time around is the widespread consumer deployment of ad blocking. (4/5)
[WIRED]

∞ Goodblock is another variation on the theme — it does everything that you expect from a standard ad blocker. Additionally it prompts the user to view one curated ad a day — clicking and viewing it will raise money that can be donated to a chosen charity. (5/5)
[Goodblock]

∞ There has been a decline in “kettle power surge” during ad breaks in peak TV occasions in the UK over the last 25 years. During the biggest TV event in 1990 — England’s World Cup semi-final against West Germany — National Grid data compiled by British Gas shows a power surge equivalent to 1.12 million kettles boiling at the same time immediately after the match. In 2014’s biggest TV event — England’s World Cup match against Uruguay — the power surge was the equivalent of only 410,000 boiling kettles.
[Internet Advertising Bureau UK]

Curated and authored by Iqbal Mohammed (@misentropy), The Future of Advertising is your weekly digest for what’s about to transpire in the tumultuous world of advertising & marketing. Sign up to receive The Future of Advertising newsletter in your inbox every Thursday, or view The Future of Advertising archive for past editions.