Making The Connection

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Most people enjoy having something in common with others and when referring to social media there are several variations that allow people to feel engaged. Scientist had discovered that a chemical in the brain called Dopamine that causes one to seek, desire and search. Its stimulation comes from unpredictability with small bits of information and reward cues (Seiter, 2016). For example, Facebook and Twitter makes people want to go online and find out what’s going on with people’s personal and professional lives on a daily basis. You also have oxytocin sometimes referred to as “the cuddle chemical” because it’s released when you kiss or hug. Oxytocin levels can rise as much as 13% — a hormonal spike equivalent to some people on their wedding day (Seiter, 2016). Self-presentation is what psychologist mention when putting yourself in a place on how you want to be viewed. People talk about themselves more online than they do in person because it gives the comfort level of really taking the time to construct more of the truth without having to sugar code it and focusing on body language. Maintaining a relationship online is important and special to build better bonds or simply just preserving the friendships.

Vulcan Post

Sharing Common Interest

Most people enjoy having something in common with others and when referring to social media there are several variations that allow people to feel engaged. Scientist had discovered that a chemical in the brain called Dopamine that causes one to seek, desire and search. Its stimulation comes from unpredictability with small bits of information and reward cues (Seiter, 2016). For example, Facebook and Twitter makes people want to go online and find out what’s going on with people’s personal and professional lives on a daily basis. You also have oxytocin sometimes referred to as “the cuddle chemical” because it’s released when you kiss or hug. Oxytocin levels can rise as much as 13% — a hormonal spike equivalent to some people on their wedding day (Seiter, 2016). Self-presentation is what psychologist mention when putting yourself in a place on how you want to be viewed. People talk about themselves more online than they do in person because it gives the comfort level of really taking the time to construct more of the truth without having to sugar code it and focusing on body language. Maintaining a relationship online is important and special to build better bonds or simply just preserving the friendships.

Jeff Bullas

Eye Catching

Algorithms play a huge part when keeping the focus on someone’s particular interest. Most people like watching sports like basketball and football. On Facebook there’s an algorithm that allows a link under “suggested video” called “NBA GameTime” and on this network sports anchors give highlights of different games from several teams with specific headlines that causes you to want to find out more on details on the story. Another is the suggested app that advertises many games to install on your phone, tablet or iPad. It shows you a preview on how to play the game and how much fun it can be making you want to download it immediately and begin to play. Homophily would fall more under the suggested apps in my opinion because you get to play games with friends and compete on different levels. Not everyone likes watching sports but most people love to play games. It also brings people together who play more games online than they do interacting through the typical form of social media such as posting, snap or tweeting. People have built serious relationships from getting to know each other just from having the same interest in one specific game.

References

Aiello, L., Barrat, A., Schifanella, R., Cattuto, C., Markines, B., & Menczer, F. (2012). Friendship prediction and homophily in social media. ACM Transactions on the Web (TWEB), 6(2), 1–33. doi:10.1145/2180861.2180866

Fu, F., Nowak, M. A., Christakis, N. A., & Fowler, J. H. (2012). The Evolution of Homophily. Retrieved December 02, 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3496167/

Seiter, C. (2017, August 20). The Psychology of Social Media: Why We Like, Comment, and Share Online. Retrieved December 02, 2017, from https://blog.bufferapp.com/psychology-of-social-media