Laguna Pueblo Congresswoman Deb Haaland Sworn-in as First Indigenous Cabinet Secretary; Now Leads Interior Department

Debra Anne Haaland (Laguna / Jemez Pueblo) attended her swearing-in ceremony at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building Ceremonial Office in Washington, D.C., wearing a ribbon skirt designed by Agnes Woodard. (Photo: U.S. Department of the Interior)

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Laguna Pueblo Congresswoman Deb Haaland of New Mexico has been officially sworn-in as secretary of the interior, making her the first Indigenous Cabinet secretary in the history of the United States.

Vice-President Kamala Harris, the first woman to hold the position, conducted the ceremony for Haaland on Thursday morning. The event lasted less than two minutes.

Haaland was confirmed by the Senate on Monday evening. The final vote was 51 to 40, with Sen. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) among four Republican senators supporting Haaland.

The second-term congresswoman’s confirmation process was…


Jubilation, an awkward folk song, and early opposition to Haaland nomination mark Biden’s bright beginning in Indian Country

Jennifer Lopez sings “This Land is Your Land” during the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden on the West Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20, 2021. (YouTube)

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Wednesday’s inauguration of the 46th President ushered in a great sense of relief across Indian Country, but not without a faux pas. On a historic day where the transfer of power resulted in an unprecedented defense for Indigenous land and life, remarkably remiss was an acknowledgment of those lands. Upon an American turning point largely defined by confronting colonization, it’s a signal that there is much work to do.

Within hours of being sworn-in, Joe Biden signed 15 executive orders to undo many of former President Donald Trump’s destructive…


Book-ended by aggressive energy deals, his presidency is one of the most hostile to Native Americans in the past half-century

President Trump at a Nov. 3, 2018 campaign rally at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport in Montana with Crow Nation tribal council members. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

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President Trump ended his administration the way he began it: by encroaching on Indigenous homelands, hungry for energy dominance.

On Friday, Jan. 15, less than a week left in the White House, Trump officials set in motion a copper mining deal in Arizona on a mountain range considered holy to the Apache. It mimicked the aggressive pace in which the president revamped the Dakota Access Pipeline in only his fourth day in office.

These are the bookends of Trump’s legacy in Indian…


Gabriella Cázeres-Kelly toasts to a campaign billboard erected in South Tucson, Pima County, Arizona during her successful 2020 campaign for recorder. (@fredurbina)

When Gabriella Cázares-Kelly won her race for Pima County recorder last November in Arizona, she was open-eyed about how tightly gripped voter suppression hung over marginalized communities like the one she grew up in — on the Tohono O’odham Nation.

Last election cycle, voters on the reservation had one less early precinct location to cast their ballots, despite their complaints. This, in part, stirred Gabriella to post billboards and do what no other Indigenous person anywhere had done before: run for a county-wide office…and win.

In Arizona, the county recorder keeps public records and is in charge of voter registration…


Senate Confirms Haaland as Interior Secretary; Marks First Indigenous Person to Oversee Native Treaty Rights and Ceded Indigenous lands

Debra Anne Haaland (Laguna / Jemez Pueblo) became the first Indigenous person to be the interior secretary, by a vote of 51–40. Her confirmation came amidst Republican backlash and delays over the Biden administration’s prioritization of climate change over energy.

Indigenously encourages you to reproduce this article by taking these steps.

Laguna Pueblo congresswoman Deb Haaland of New Mexico has been confirmed as the secretary of the interior, making her the first Indigenous Cabinet secretary in the history of the United States.

Haaland was confirmed by the Senate on Monday evening. The final vote was 51 to 40, with Sen. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) among Republican senators supporting Haaland.

The second-term congresswoman’s confirmation process was mired in debate over her past stance against fossil fuels. …


The confirmation hearing for Interior Secretary nominee Rep. Deb Haaland is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 9:30 a.m. ET

Rep. Deb Haaland sworn-in to Congress on January 3, 2019 wearing her traditional mhanta and other Pueblo finery. She is here with her daughter, Somah (left), and other extended family and friends.

A date has been set for the much-anticipated confirmation hearing of Interior Secretary nominee, Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico, a tribal citizen of the Laguna Pueblo.

The historic hearing will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 9:30 AM ET before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee — the first time a Native American will be considered for a cabinet position by the Senate. If confirmed, Haaland will make history again in becoming the first Native American Cabinet secretary in our 243-year history as a nation.

Haaland’s confirmation hearing is part of a flurry of hearings stalled by…


Credit: via CBS News

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WASHINGTON — For the first time in history, a sitting U.S. president has been impeached not once, but twice. President Donald Trump was sanctioned by the U.S. House of Representatives on a single article for inciting an insurrection on Jan. 6.

A Senate trial is not expected to take place before Trump leaves office on Jan. 20, when Democrat Joe Biden will be inaugurated to succeed him.

Lawmakers voted 232–197 to hold Trump accountable for the violent riot on the U.S. Capitol which resulted in five…


One of several billboards across the state of Arizona to mobilize Native voters in the 2020 Election. (MK Titla)

Among Arizona’s Indigenous electorate, the biggest support for Biden came from a county no one’s talking about.

This story is a project of the Indigenously newsletter. Sign up today. It’s free.

For Native voters, this election year has dealt us one disappointing data dilemma after another. It began weeks leading up to Election Day when journalists casually cast us off as a “low voter turnout” population but with little modern evidence to support these claims. On Election Night, we were quickly othered into a “Something Else” category with nearly zero attention paid to the small but significant impact Native voters, everywhere, have had in past elections. …


One of several billboards across the state of Arizona to mobilize Native voters in the 2020 Election. (MK Titla)

In Arizona, significant support for Biden came from an Indigenous electorate no one is talking about.

This story is a project of the Indigenously newsletter. Sign up today. It’s free.

For Native voters this election year, we’ve been dealt one disappointing data dilemma after another. It began weeks leading up to Election Day when journalists casually cast us off as a “low voter turnout” population but with little modern evidence to support these claims. On Election Night, we were quickly othered into a “Something Else” category with little attention paid to the small but significant impact Native voters, everywhere, can have in an election cycle. …


Candidate Jackie Fielder (D) campaigning for California’s State House District 11 seat in San Francisco, Oct. 12. (@JackieFieleder/Instagram)

A total of 146 Natives are in races big and small, making their voices heard nationwide and in 10 states.

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A record number of Indigenous candidates, including a historic number of Native women, could be elected to offices nationwide on Tuesday, in what would close the gap on the invisibility of Indigenous issues in government affairs.

An unprecedented 146 Native candidates are running as Democrat, Republican, Independent, and of the newly formed Aloha ʻĀina Party, for seats available across the House of Representatives and the Senate…

Jenni Monet

Journalist and media critic reporting on Indigenous Affairs | Founder of the weekly newsletter @Indigenous_ly | Kʰɑwɑjkʰɑ (@LagunaPueblo ) jennimonet.com

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