Being successful vs. being known
Paul Jarvis
2919

How do I handle the professional relationships developed during the periods of life of being a megaphone?

…as soon as someone becomes more of a megaphone than a maker, their skills start to slip

I recently experienced this in my ventures and I found the odd position of reintroducing myself to my own skills I knew I put down somewhere — and the people I once knew. The relationships developed during the creative times versus the “megaphone” times can be extremely opposite one another and it takes patience and skill to keep balance.

When I found I was acting as more of a promoter/marketer, or in other words a megaphone, I developed relationships that seemingly created value to this part of my work and life. As a natural “maker” and aspiring entrepreneur, being known was definitely disguised as success. Through certain efforts I found myself known even on a national level, yet I still had a form of emptiness occurring behind the scenes. Something was missing.

Was this because I am naturally a maker? Probably. Regardless, one lesson holds true: People come in and out of our lives and how we choose to let others in can dramatically impact your life choices.

Sometimes life circumstances put me in a position where I felt I needed specific relationships that I later learned I always had choice over. One things for sure, keep focused on your true passions and let those drive you.

What if you don’t know what you’re passionate about? There’s nothing wrong with giving yourself time to think and choose. (Decide quickly though. Time is the most precious thing to an entrepreneur…)

So in switching back to being more of an open thinker, a maker, some relationships that I’ve maintained for over 3 years have suddenly become less valuable to me. At first I felt ashamed to think this way. Then I got back in gear and realized this is my life — this is my story to write.

That’s not to say I’ve thrown away everyone I know because of a knew sense of creativity. It simply means that you have to give your creative juices the right energy, and people create a ton of energy so you have to choose carefully.

How others respond to your seemingly sudden distance, as long as it’s done tastefully on your part, is their challenge in adjusting to you. The most loyal will not only understand, but support you in the process.

— AGE

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