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The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as a distributed application developer on the EOSIO blockchain. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’ve just stumbled in here and feel lost, I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

By now you’ve managed to achieve all kinds of functionality with your smart contract, but your still missing a fundamental piece, receiving and transferring value…

Things are different on the EOSIO network… payments are made to the eosio.token contract, and not directly to the contract’s action like on other blockchains. This means we need to listen for payments being made to our contract and provide the appropriate actions. Don’t worry, it’s simpler than it sounds! We are going to listen to the eosio.token::transfer notification sent by the eosio.token contract. Simply define our handler method by replacing our regular [[eosio::action] definition with [[eosio.token::on_notify(“eosio.token::transfer”)]]. This notification is sent when a token transfer occurs which involves your contract’s account. Let’s breakdown the complete transfer notification handler. …


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This article aims to outline a complete Electron development to rollout project pipeline. I’ll be covering everything from creating your initial Electron boilerplate with React, all the way through to building and publishing to an Amazon AWS S3 Bucket. We will then look at creating a static Gatsby site to list our distributions, delving into automatic S3 deployment and utilizing CloudFront and Route 53. The complete project for this can be found on Github.

The Project Environment

Let’s get our project started by laying out our boilerplate, we’re going to make this easier by using create-reacton-app. Short disclaimer, I wrote it… so if your having problems, sorry! …


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Welcome back to the Advanced EOS development series, here I’ll be touching on techniques and functionality rarely covered by tutorials or courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as a distributed application developer on the EOSIO blockchain. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise to the topic being discussed. …


Image for post
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Welcome back to the Advanced EOS development series, here I’ll be touching on advanced techniques and functionality which is rarely covered by tutorials or courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as a distributed application developer on the EOS network. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced or extended topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise to the purpose being discussed. …


Image for post
Image for post

Welcome back to the Advanced EOS development series, here I’ll be touching on advanced techniques and functionality which is rarely covered by tutorials or courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as a distributed application developer on the EOS network. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced or extended topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise only to the purpose being discussed. …


Image for post
Image for post

Welcome back to the Advanced EOS development series, here I’ll be touching on advanced techniques and functionality which is rarely covered by tutorials or courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as a distributed application developer on the EOS network. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced or extended topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise only to the purpose being discussed. …


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So you ‘re either a React developer dabbling into the world of electron, or your looking to extend the abilities of Electron. Either way, you’ve ended up here because you’ve asked yourself the same question that took me down the rabbit hole, “How can I use React inside Electron?”.

I’m not going to be making anything spectacular in this example. To be honest, I had trouble compiling my own Electron project with React, so I simplified everything down to this boilerplate template. In this example, we’re simply going to make React compile our basic project, then build our application distributions using Electron. …


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Welcome to the Advanced EOS development series where I’ll be touching on techniques and functionality which is rarely covered by tutorials and courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as an application developer on the EOS network. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting with Part 1 and working your way up. For Part 2 of this series, we will be looking at Singletons, all code for this example can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced or extended topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise to the topic being discussed. …


Image for post
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Welcome to the Advanced EOS development series where I’ll be touching on techniques and functionality which is rarely covered by tutorials and courses. The purpose of this series is to bring together the missing pieces you’ll need to complete your skills as an application developer on the EOS network. Each post is ordered by difficulty, so if you’d like a general overview I’d recommend starting right here and working your way up. The full code for these examples can be found here on GitHub.

As these are advanced or extended topics, I’m dangerously assuming you already know the basics and are looking to further your knowledge. For that reason, the code shared in these articles will be concise to the topic being discussed. …

Mitch Pierias

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