Moments on 34th Street


I find myself using LinkedIn a lot in 2016 or at least this month for the first time ever in my life because I realized the value of value, on LinkedIn, links. (shock)

Last week on LinkedIn there was an article about Asian Americans becoming more visible as far as choices for acting and I wanted to take a picture as a comment but there wasn’t the ability to do that so I made a comment about how there wasn’t the ability to do that which got a lot of likes, at least a lot of likes as far as I’m concerned for a comment on LinkedIn.

The least amount of effort as we perceive effort to be seems to be what we always gravitate to. If somebody teases a video with a one line snippet, they don’t save you the click with the line which personally I’d prefer but they entice you enough to actually click on the link. If you knew ahead of time it would lead to a video, how long the video would be you can schedule what needs scheduling, which is really what we care about.

Hence this title, Moments on 34th Street, Douglas Rushkoff’s book, Throwing Rocks At The Google Bus, is mentioned in an article on digitaltrends.com by Rick Stella and one of the capsule quotes from the article says that if your app makes users rich they will like it. Examples of apps that do that Vimeo, Dropbox, eBay… emotional resonators, products with tangible value.

In the movie if you haven’t seen it, the Santa for Macy’s sends people to Gimbels to get items that aren’t carried at Macy’s, initially the manager is freaked out however it turns out to be the greatest goodwill campaign ever devised for the public. So the public is getting rich by getting what they want, in this case information and that’s really the end of the story. If you refer to my other article that I posted last week about how we can make money by leveraging the natural attribution potential of the internet, you can see where this is going.

Last time I heard 5 hours a second is what’s uploaded to YouTube, so again the goodwill is how you split the sale and if you have a Melting Pot Niagara Falls of transactions to split, predicated on the information that can be compartmentalised and incentivized within the container of a video, you see the potential.

Context. Context like you’ve never seen before.

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