Postcard from Dakar

mVAM workshop participants all smiles after learning more about IVR WFP/Lucia Casarn

mVAM workshop participants all smiles after learning more about IVR WFP/Lucia Casarn

During the last week of June, staff from WFP HQ’s mVAM team, the West and Central Africa Regional Bureau, and Nigeria and Niger Country Offices met in beautiful Dakar to work together on Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for two-way communication. (If you want to dig deep into all details IVR-related, check out the lesson in our mVAM online course!)

We’ve previously blogged about how WFP is responding to the needs of people who have been displaced due to Boko Haram insurgencies in both Nigeria and Niger. When we implemented these operations we also put communication channels in place so beneficiaries are able to contact WFP. In Nigeria, the Maiduguri Field Office created a hotline. Their operators receive an average of 100 calls per day from beneficiaries asking food security-related questions and providing feedback on the operations. The problem is the hotline is only available during working hours and has a limited number of people who can call in at the same time. To work around this they’re therefore looking at how an IVR system can support the call operators who are dealing with high volumes and better manage calls that take place outside of normal office hours. WFP Niger wants to set up a similar hotline system but without full time phone operators. Beneficiaries will call in to an automated IVR system and their queries and feedback recorded by the system and followed up by the Country Office.

A Nigeria IT Officer working to install a GSM gateway for IVR usage in Maiduguri WFP/Lucia Casarin

A Nigeria IT Officer working to install a GSM gateway for IVR usage in Maiduguri WFP/Lucia Casarin

During the workshop participants were trained by InSTEDD on how to physically deploy IVR using a GSM gateway (a fancy tool that automatically places phone calls) and Verboice, the free open source software they’ve developed to manage these systems. The team also discussed the nitty gritty technical aspects of the system, including creating and modifying call flows (the sequencing of questions), scheduling calls and downloading collected call logs and recordings. Most importantly, participants had the opportunity to share their experiences and challenges with experts in this field and discuss best practices, alternative deployments and technical solutions.

The Country Office staff have now returned to Niger and Nigeria and they’ve already started testing the use of the IVR machines. We’re eager to begin logging data and hearing more from our beneficiaries. So stay tuned!


Originally published at MVAM: THE BLOG.

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