How Green is Europe’s Green Economic Recovery?
How Green is Europe’s Green Economic Recovery?

Well, not so green after all

In June, the IMF (International Monetary Fund) released a report stating that the world GDP would end 2020 with a 5% drop. The reaction of world markets to the suspension of their businesses and stocks due to the coronavirus pandemic was such that this projected recession is compared to the Great Depression. But in 2020, we have a new difficulty: the red light of the climate crisis. 2019 ended with promises of a decade focused on sustainable economic investments and, now, world leaders have presented plans to heat the economy in a “greener” way. Or, so they say. …


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Illustration: Modefica

Or how to transform a vital movement into a marketing strategy

It is difficult to make sense of the present day. While Australia’s forests burn due to the climate crisis, the country’s prime minister, Scott Morrison, is a climate denier. In Brazil, despite dozens of reports and research proving the importance of the Amazon rainforest, we see the legalization of deforestation. If, on the one hand, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) says we have only 10 years to keep the temperature rise at 1.5C, on the other, banks and governments continue to put billions of dollars into the fossil fuel industry. …


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Illustration: Victoria Lobo

Between 2017 and 2019, more than 80,000 Uyghurs were transferred to work in 27 manufacturing facilities that supply 83 global brands

Since 2017, China has drawn the attention of international human rights activists about the massive and forced transfer of Uyghurs to so-called “re-education” camps. Uyghurs are a Turkic speaking Muslim minority who mainly live in Central Asia, in the Xinjiang region, a province in northwestern China home to several ethnic minorities. After “graduating” from the camps, they are sent to work in factories in different regions of the country in slavery-like conditions. …


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The change will not happen without joint efforts and much less is it a simple mission, but the pandemic presents us with an important fissure in the modus operandi of the world

People are gradually realizing the gravity of the pandemic plaguing the world. I believe that the coronavirus will completely change all ways of thinking and acting as a society. As always, the poorest and most vulnerable already emerge as the main victims of an unequal system. Amid the chaos, people are forced to remember we are social creatures: contracts, travels, meetings, weddings, studies, romances — all canceled. The social functions that were not postponed became spreaders for the disease that is not expected to have a cure anytime soon. …


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What Covid-19 is revealing is that, if there were willingness, it would be possible to act quickly and effectively against climate change.

There are several articles in prominent vehicles trying to understand the reasons why Covid-19 managed to shake the world while the climatic collapse cannot. The latter is broader in scale and more dangerous when it comes to threatening people’s lives, yet is unable to move a needle for significant changes. At the same time, there are tons of debates and evidence about the enormous capacity of capitalism to generate epidemics derived from uncontrolled growth, coupled with the lack of support such as access to health, decent food, basic sanitation, etc, for most of the global population.

Although both discussions are…


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Hopes are that Covid-19 could act as a lesson and pose necessary change

The numbers of deaths, as well as suspected and infected cases from the Coronavirus (Covid-19) are constantly rising. Whether in Europe, the current epicenter of the pandemic, the Middle East or the Americas. China’s contamination peak is over, and numbers are decreasing, but that is far from implying everything is back to normal. A group of scientists warns that the crash could extend until 2021 — affecting everything from people’s mental health to the global economy. What the Coronavirus pandemic is teaching us is that we are not prepared to deal with a worldwide disaster like climate change.

Many questioned…


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We talked with Kate Fletcher about the circular economy, emotional design and sustainable fashion

Author of Fashion and Sustainability: Design for Change, published in 2012, the researcher, consultant, and design activist Kate Fletcher is considered one of the most significant references in the discussion about the possible — and sometimes impossible — connections between fashion and sustainability.

To compose her newest book, Craft of Use: Post-Growth Fashion, she visited more than 50 cities and communities in nine countries to gather over 500 examples of how people use and take care of their clothes.

She currently supervises Ph.D. students at the Center for Sustainable Fashion, which is located within the London College of Fashion. She…


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Illustration: Modefica

New packaging, same content: If we are really entering a new era, we need a new way of thinking and doing fashion

Fashion representations in scenarios, characters, and relationships are marked by segregation and exclusion. The movie The Devil Wears Prada chanced upon all the stereotypes and archetypes built over a century on the concept of fashion as we know it, in the contemporary world. In 2016, the film turned 10 years old. Some questions about how much the characters presented and represented are representative in real life were suspended in my mind.

Do these characters represent real people, or are they necessary exaggerations of the entertainment world? Since fashion lives on the image, how much do real people in this industry…


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Augustina Comas at Galpão Comas, when discard shirts are upcycled into dresses, tops, and skirts.

With creative and perseverance, these entrepreneurs are proposing a new mindset for discarded clothes and textiles

The linear model of extracting, producing and discarding, increasingly faster and in increasingly unjustifiable volumes makes less and less sense in accordance with predictions of inconsistent natural resource flows in the not so distant future.

A quick look at the numbers proves that there is something wrong with insisting on the Fordist mindset in the fashion industry. According to a survey by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, an English organization established in 2010 with a mission to accelerate the transition to a circular economy, about $500 billion is lost every year in garments that are barely used or recycled. …

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