Monday Moose Roundup: March 21

Six of the best Canada-related links turning our heads and occupying our minds over the last week.

Where Canada stands in measures of world happiness

Happiness! Image courtesy of flickr user Lapplandfan.

The 2016 World Happiness Report made headlines this week, showing that life contentment, like success in the Winter Olympics, is greatest in the north. Read the full report here. Figure 2.2 breaks down the elements making up the score, such as social support, freedom, and health.

Crying it out in rich nations

The other side of global happiness is global teariness … or is it? The Economist’s new culture, lifestyle and ideas magazine,1843, digs into what crying really means, where tears are really shed, the myth of the “stiff upper lip,” and why Charles Darwin was, in fact, a pretty great dad.

Ketchupgate and the blind ketchup test

You may have heard that Loblaws tried to remove French’s from their stores and was met with a serious backlash. But which ketchup is best? Watch below as the G&M tests French’s, Heinz, PC and No Name in a surprisingly hilarious video to find one ketchup to rule them all:

New Senators include Olympian and author

The PM appointed seven new senators this week from across the spectrum and the country, including one who once wrote a book about how all politicians are liars. Because it’s 2016?

Montreal Study explores the controversial subject of optimal bus stop placement

Anyone who has run to catch a bus across a busy intersection just as the light is changing can identify with just how important stop placement is for safety and efficiency. Near side? Far side? Even mid-block has its advocates. This Montreal study believes it has discovered the best overall spot — and it might surprise you.

The hardest studiers in Canada probably didn’t attend your school

Can you guess which school this is? Image courtesy of Flickr user John Marino.

Maclean’s has come out with its annual survey of which university’s students spend the most time studying per week. Its corollary, where students party the most, can be found here. What happens at the schools that aren’t high on either list?

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