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How entrepreneurial innovation emerges and prospers is a theme that has nowadays received considerable attention. Past studies have emphasized that innovation does not happen in a vacuum but within a dense nexus of relationships with other parties in the entrepreneurial ecosystem (EE), defined as “the union of localized cultural outlooks, social networks, investment capital, universities, and active economic policies that create environments supportive of innovation-based ventures” (Spiegel, 2015). This line of inquiry has focused on a number of different factors that enable the emergence of EE.

For example, Teece has argued that the social rate of return on inventive activity carried systematically in EE significantly exceeds the rate of return gained by private for-profit firms on their investments in R and D (Teece, 2018); the role of EE becomes particularly effective with enabling technologies, defined by Teece as technologies providing a base for other technologies to combine with them to achieve ends that could not be achieved without them (Teece, 2018); which binds well with Nelson argument that a large proportion of the knowledge used by inventors in a field at any time is knowledge shared by the technological community, else EE (Nelson…


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Why the topic is important

The concept of transformation through digital integration and innovation has gained considerable attention in the business world since the iPhone was launched in 2007. Initially, we entered into an early adoption phase of disruptive technologies such as wireless sensors, cloud computing, big data processed by artificial intelligence and smartphones, as the new consumer interface. The maturity of this phase leads us in a second phase of massive adoption of these technologies; it is clear executives are mostly facing difficulties in adapting corporate strategy to the transformations required to successfully innovate and benefit from new technologies. What is the difference between companies which are extremely effective at digital transformation and other which seem to be experimenting with a range of activities mostly disconnected from their corporate strategy? …


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Background

My research has been inspired by the work of R/GA with leading innovative brands such as Nike, and a book by Barry Wacksman, Connected by Design, in which he argues that today’s fierce global competition and rapid technological change has made traditional growth strategies of horizontal and vertical integration less effective.

In the industrial age, growth meant constantly expanding into new products and services, broadening the portfolios of businesses and continuously finding new things to sell to consumers. …


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In September of last year I was invited to a convention called ‘Energie per l’Italia,’ organised by Stefano Parisi, a leading figure on the Italian political scene. The initiative was based around a subject close to my heart: generating new ideas to energise Italy, especially from a technology point of view.

I’m very pleased to say that his team asked me to coordinate a working group dedicated to the digital transformation of Italy’s public administration, and the country itself.

I love applying design thinking processes to social problems — but to be perfectly honest, I was excited and intimidated at the same time. The goal of the group was to build part of the political offering of a new movement, and delivering against such a project, with a brand new team at national level, was a huge challenge. However, it was very inspiring and I would love to share with you our initial thinking about the tasks facing Italy from a digital standpoint. …


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In this blog post, I would like to share my observations and ideas for debate about inter-connected ecosystems.

We can see all around us that in the digital, social, and mobile age these ecosystems have become the core innovation drivers that have delivered most reliably and powerfully for pioneers like Amazon, Apple and Google, as well as mainstream players like Nike, GM, BMW and McCormick.

Observation 1: Looking at change in growth strategies

Companies have traditionally grown by integrating either horizontally — adding new products or services — or vertically, by controlling the supply chain. …


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I have spent many years collaborating with incubators and accelerators. It has given me the time to understand deeply the benefits of the model they use — but also the problems they face regularly.

This article discusses how the model of incubators and accelerators could be applied to a different set of players, to solve a different problem: unemployment among the young. Since moving back to Italy, I have seen how relevant the problem of unemployment is to young people: today it stands, shockingly, at over 40 percent.

Above all, I believe education, collaboration and exposure are the main benefits of incubator and accelerator programmes. The right methodology is crucial to achieving a solid execution, and finding the time in a young team to dedicate to getting this right is very important. …


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Hi everyone and welcome to my first article for 2016. In addition to building Nuwe, this year I’m taking on a brand new challenge…

I’ll be working towards a doctorate, undertaking research into how modern enterprises manage their ecosystems. My particular area of interest is the logic of ‘functional integration,’ for companies managing a portfolio of business models focused on building high value for their consumers.

The main objective of my research is to provide a framework for managing ecosystemsthat leverages a mix of traditional and digital business models to grow. The research is driven by the rising phenomenon of functional integration, which large brands such as Nike and Apple have been exploiting with great success. In the digital, social, and mobile age, interactive interconnected ecosystems have helped digital pioneers like Amazon and Google as well as mainstream players like GM, BMW and McCormick. …


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I was lucky enough to spend last week in Barcelona debating the future of IoT with some great minds, and I really want to share some of our thoughts.

The interesting element about the debate is that we applied a philosophical twist to it: we debated following the rules of a socratic dialogue, which gave us a framework to avoid losing track of the main objective and falling into the classic loop of opinions. (To know more about this please visit http://humbertoschwab.net.)

We are still programmed for living in an industrial society, but it’s pretty clear we’ve already moved into a new digital world. It’s a new era that we need to understand and build together by making new rituals, concepts, paradigms and strategies. Believe it or not, we will all be the key drivers of this process and we need a framework to start designing the world we want to live in. …


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It’s a question I’ve started to ask people when I talk about the work we do at Nuwe. And everyone generally replies with a loud “yes.”

But if I dig a little deeper and ask how they measure what we mean by ‘well,’ I find that’s where the confusion starts. We all instinctively know that without well people there would be no family, no work, no progress, no economy.

When we ask other questions like “Are you financially wealthy?” people can easily start a quantification process. They start thinking of their salary, their savings, their mortgages, their credit cards bills… they have a clear set of metrics defined by another important form of social capital called financial wealth. …


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I’m not sure how I’ve found the time to write this post: it’s only ten days into Nuwe’s accelerator programme but it seems like months, considering the ground covered.

The picture above hopefully tells you a bit about how we feel right now: we’re using every available resource to climb ‘the wall’ that can make our startup a real company with a repeatable business model.

So here’s a few of the adjustments we’ve had to make, just to keep up with the experience.

N1: Stay fit and energetic

We are a health company so hopefully it’s in our DNA, but during an accelerator you spend so much time in workshops and meetings that you feel exhausted — at exactly the time you’re meant to apply all this learning to your business. …

About

Sergio Mottola

Blockchain & Digital Transformation Strategy Expert. Speaker. Thinker. Mentor. Innovator. Investor.

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