I found something interesting in my inbox today…

…And it was a letter, an e-mail, from past me to future me (well, technically, present me). I have a habit of writing myself a letter through one of the many websites that offer to send post-dated e-mails. This one I wrote in one of my lowest times and it goes:


Transcription:

Dear Me (in the future), A year before today, you were frustrated. The man you love at the time was letting you slip away. [Cut]— these where his only efforts. A year before today, you somehow lost hope. Your idea of love, after years of dreaming about it, has finally touched reality…and reality broke it to pieces. A year before today, you wrote a letter to tell the future you that if you are now in love with someone who treats you like the precious gem that you are, treat yourself to an ice cream. And even if you’re still moping around, single, not a soul mate in sight, buy yourself an ice cream nonetheless. Don’t settle for someone who takes you for granted. And don’t ever take anyone for granted. You, of all people, know how it feels like. Sincerely, The Setti of 2013


In respect of the man I was talking about in the first paragraph, I have decided to block out the details of the issues I have long since buried.


After reading this letter, I felt— like I always do upon reading my past accounts— humbled. It reminded that I did not get to where I am unscathed; we all go through some form of pain whenever life fancies to deal us a nasty blow. The trick is to be strong enough to push yourself up and counterattack with a roundhouse kick.

If I could contact the Setti of 2013, I would thank her for holding up like she did a for being thoughtful enough to remind me of our past ordeal, and finally for gathering courage to liberate herself from despair so I, too, could be free. And I am.

But I can’t go back to the past— not yet anyway. But what I can do is pass another letter to the Setti of 2015 and remind her once again that life is full of miseries… ones that we can rise above.

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