On being dismissed

So after 20 years at the Met Office I got sacked. This is less about that, and more about what I did immediately afterwards. What follows is very specific to UK employment, could be wrong, and is really just a collection of short notes about what I did.

If you’re a Civil Servant you can be dismissed with immediate effect. There’s an appeal process of course, but you can, as I did, find yourself signing for a letter and learn that as of the day before you don’t have a job, or a salary.

Don’t panic

If you’ve been employed full time for 2 years or more you’ll have been paying National Insurance which means you’ll get “contribution based JSA” (Job Seeker’s Allowance). Depending on your circumstances, rent, partner, children, caring for a parent, etc. you’ll get other help too. But as with so many things you’ll need to ask. What you won’t get from your former employer is any guidance on this stuff, at least not openly offered. So you’re going to need to go here -

https://www.gov.uk/jobseekers-allowance

If you’re impatient to learn what benefits you’re likely to receive try this calculator -

What else?

Well likely you’ll want to appeal against dismissal. In my case I had 10 working days to appeal, apparently this can vary — though maybe not for Public Sector workers. You might like help with this, and if you’re in a union they’ll most likely have been helping you since the charge of Misconduct or similar was made, if not then maybe your professional body can help. I’ve decided to go with a public access barrister, but that’s a personal choice, not a recommendation. See -

What next?

Finding work is likely to be high priority for most in this situation, but there are other options. For example if you’re a member of the “Classic” Civil Service Pension and over 50 you could elect to start taking your pension. Apparently the process of activating it can take 3 months, and once you’re drawing your pension you can’t stop.

Looking for work

…. coming soon.

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