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Photo by sydney Rae on Unsplash

When a big storm is forecast to come our way, Katie, my wife, starts to plan ahead, just in case we lose power: non-perishable food in the pantry (check), flashlights with working batteries (check), gas in the car (check), some cash on hand (check). She reminds family members to charge up their phones and laptops. The havoc the storm may, or may not, cause is unknown but she has taken proactive steps to get us through.

If you travel by air, you’re acquainted with the standard safety instructions that are demonstrated by flight attendants before the plane takes off. Among…


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Photo by Paul Millerd on Unsplash

Practically overnight the vast majority of office workers became remote workers when social distancing measures put in place in March to slow the spread of the Covid-19 virus dramatically changed the way we go about our days. If that was you, over the last several months, you have had a taste of the long-touted benefits of remote work — no commute (a savings of nearly an hour a day for the average American plus the cost of commuting) and flexibility. …


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Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

How can we protect people in the workplace so they don’t contract Covid-19? The Centers for Disease Control just released guidelines for offices that include temperature and symptom checks; encouraging employees who have Covid-19 symptoms or sick family members to stay home; prohibiting hand-shaking, hugs, and fist bumps; wearing face coverings; physical distancing of work stations (or separation by plastic shields); and eliminating seating in common areas.

Will people follow-through and do their part for the good of the whole? …


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Photo by BRUNO CERVERA on Unsplash

Are you home and feeling alone? Are you home and wishing you could be alone for even a few minutes? The Covid-19 virus has caused many organizations to move large numbers of employees from working together at the office to working remotely at home. For other organizations, it has meant temporarily shutting its doors and having to furlough workers or let employees go. Unless you are an “essential worker,” gone is the time you spent interacting with strangers, colleagues and friends as you commuted to work, ducked out to grab a meal or run an errand, and did your job…


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The novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the need for social distancing, quarantine and isolation so that vulnerable individuals are not exposed to the virus and healthcare systems are not overwhelmed. Collectively, we understand the goodness of “flattening the curve” by each of us doing our part to slow the spread of the virus.

COVID-19 is not the only epidemic we are facing. Separating ourselves because of COVID-19 comes at a time when America and many other nations are in the midst of an epidemic of loneliness whose antidote is greater positive social connection.

Our current situation — the…


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Photo by bruce mars from Pexels

With the exception of America, suicide rates over recent decades have declined in most of the world. Suicides in the U.S. have risen more than 50% from 2005 to 2017 and now exceed deaths by motor vehicle incidents. In 2017, the most recent year data is available, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported 10.6 million people seriously considered suicide, 1.4 million attempted suicide and 47,000 committed suicide.

We can look at those numbers dispassionately, understanding they represent individual lives, but not stopping long enough to let the reality sink in. So, here’s another way to put the number…


A Hidden Systemic Risk to Organizations

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Photo by Parker Byrd on Unsplash

Much has been written about America’s loneliness epidemic, including in the workplace. The word “loneliness” in the work context is a misnomer. It doesn’t capture the whole story.

What about all of the individuals who might not think of themselves as lonely and yet the demands of work and task-oriented activities such as time in front of screens have crowded out time for anything more than superficial relationships? Many people lack sufficient, positive human connection (or social connection) and may be unaware of the ramifications. …


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Photo by Alex Kotliarskyi on Unsplash

What a Deficiency of Connection Does to You, Those You Care About and Your Organization

Much has been written about America’s loneliness epidemic, including in the workplace. The word “loneliness” in the work context is a misnomer. It doesn’t capture the whole story. What about all of the individuals who might not think of themselves as lonely and yet the demands of work and task-oriented activities such as time in front of screens have crowded out time for anything more than superficial relationships? Many people lack sufficient, positive human connection (or social connection) and may be unaware of the ramifications…


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The first to study female leadership 30 years ago, Sally Helgesen is the co-author with Marshall Goldsmith of the current bestselling book How Women Rise. In her ground-breaking book titled The Female Advantage: Women’s Ways of Leadership, published in 1990, she studied a number of America’s most successful female leaders by following them around and closely watching them, five observations stood out. She found that women leaders:

  • place a high value on relationships,
  • have a bias for direct communication rather than following the chain of command,
  • put themselves at the center of the people they lead,
  • are comfortable with diversity…

It may indicate a deeper problem you should know about.

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Photo by NordWood Themes on Unsplash

Are you addicted to your smartphone? Do you feel the pull to constantly check your messages and news feeds?

Are you addicted to busyness? As soon as you accomplish something, do you immediately focus on the next task or problem to solve? Are you always thinking about what you have coming up and so it’s difficult to be present with and focused on interacting with others?

If your answer is yes to one or more of these questions, you may have or be developing an addiction that’s tied to dopamine…

Michael Lee Stallard

My calling is to connect people and help them develop and maintain cultures of connection. I write, give keynote speeches and teach on that topic.

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