January 2021

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Siarhei Horbach on Unsplash

Welcome to 2021.

We all want to put last year behind us and forget about it. We’ve been through a lot globally. Unfortunately we’ll need to endure some more before it gets any better.

But it will get better.

At least 2020 brought the start of world governments’ coordinated stance against Big Tech’s influence and monopolies. Whether or not this will lead to meaningful change remains to be seen. We’ll be here for that.

For this third edition we’re joined by Founder and CEO of Eticas Consulting Dr. …


December 2020

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Chris Yang on Unsplash

We’re arriving at the end of 2020 and the global pandemic has forced us into increased technological dependency.

One thing is for sure, tech companies are the great winners. Amid the stress and the struggle we’ve been put against, these have amassed even greater power from our dependency.

We are now totally reliant on private digital mediators to continue with our lives: being schooled, working, being entertained or simply to keep in touch with our loved ones. If this trend continues, how will it end up?

In these times we should be thankful for technology we have at our disposal but we must also be wary of the asymmetrical relation we have with it. …


November 2020

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by sebastiaan stam on Unsplash

Welcome

If you’ve arrived here it means you may have a feeling that digital technology is no longer something neutral in our lives.

Technology’s in our pockets, on our wrists, at work, supermarkets, schools and our homes. It has its own agenda which may or may not be in line with ours. With such pervasiveness, it becomes imperative to be critical and ponder both the positive or negative outcomes of its usage for our collective future.

Critical Future Tech’s aim is to provide thinking points and conversation starters on the impact of technology in our lives as well as serving as a meeting point on the Portuguese scene to discuss these themes. …


A practical walkthrough on building a micro frontend architecture with multiple Vue.js apps using single-spa. Note that you can replace Vue with your framework of choice.

Person stacking colorful blocks on top of each other.
Person stacking colorful blocks on top of each other.
Photo by La-Rel Easter on Unsplash

The first article of a three part guide that aims at laying the foundations on how to setup and organize a micro frontend architecture for your projects using single-spa.

Part 1 — setup the orchestrator layer which loads the necessary assets, 3rd party libraries and our micro applications;

Part 2 (TBD) — organizing common styles and reusable components; sharing and manipulating state between apps;

Part 3 (TBD) — deploying to Netlify while avoiding concurrency;

What are Micro Frontends?

The concept of micro frontends has been around for a while now but has been getting more attention in the past couple of years. …


Plowing through one PR crisis after another, could its long term goals not be purely financial gain?

A neon sign flickers intermittently the words Facebook and Government.
A neon sign flickers intermittently the words Facebook and Government.

Is it far-fetched to speculate that Facebook’s long term goal may entail becoming more than a mere place to sell ads to people, but actually a global powerhouse for mass manipulation of ideologies, perceptions and beliefs? Some might argue that it is already the case, but I want to further explore this thought.

First, the response Facebook has regarding the perceived negative impact of its actions (and inactions) makes me wonder to what extend the company cares for maximizing its profits, at least on the long term. …


Extreme societal events are always an opportunity to bring people and nations together¹. But they can also put at risk our individual freedoms.

A group of people with medical masks takes a photo of a painting of the Mona Lisa, also wearing a medical mask.
A group of people with medical masks takes a photo of a painting of the Mona Lisa, also wearing a medical mask.
Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

The sentence “desperate times call for desperate measures” can entail both relief and fear depending on who says it and the involved measures. We may not be desperate yet but for many of us this is a wildly abnormal situation whose ending is still very much unknown.

The global COVID-19 pandemic has world governments racing to contain its spread, trying to keep their economies from tanking and appeasing people’s anxieties to the best of their ability. …


Labor organizing at Google and other big tech companies is just the beginning

A woman holds a sign with “Tech for I.C.E.” crossed out in a protest against tech involvement in immigration enforcement.
A woman holds a sign with “Tech for I.C.E.” crossed out in a protest against tech involvement in immigration enforcement.
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and Alphabet have each reached a $1 trillion market capitalization. While many are in awe at this growth in wealth and technological power, others, specifically the workers at these companies themselves, are worried about the ramifications that such an asymmetric power dynamic entails.

Tech workers are seeing firsthand where Big Tech’s idealistic missions of “connecting the world” or “organizing the world’s information” stand when it comes to capitalistic values. Over the past decade, Big Tech’s misaligned corporate values have contributed to the disillusion of a millennial workforce.

Many workers have come to see themselves as unwilling contributors to problematic societal issues through their daily work, and many have chosen to revolt against their own companies. In 2016, Facebook employees publicly quit following the company’s development of censorship tools in efforts to enter the Chinese market. In 2018, Google’s employees protested the company’s censored search engine project for China, and the same year, a group of engineers refused to work on a security tool designed to earn the company military contracts with the Pentagon. …


As technology companies become ever more engrained in every aspect of our daily lives, we must remain attentive as to how these interact between us and our governments. In this piece, I try to run through events that I believe show a glimpse on the potential threats we may face in an information society.

A woman falling through the cracks with subtle colors including orange and blush.
A woman falling through the cracks with subtle colors including orange and blush.
Illustration by Supriya Bhonsle

Digitized Revolutions

If I had to sum up the decade of the 2010s, I’d definitely go with the words: social unrest. …


Setting up a Continuous Integration pipeline from A to Z that: runs tests, builds the app and deploys it to Netlify. Let’s do it! 🤓

Image for post
Image for post

By now you’ve probably deployed a project to Netlify using their UI by linking a GitHub/GitLab project and setting up the necessary steps to build the app.’

What you may not know is that Netlify has a Node-based CLI tool that lets you deploy from the terminal.

Moreover, GitLab’s CI/CD pipelines provide 2,000 monthly CI pipeline minutes for free that we can use to automate our test & deploy process.

Content


Image for post
Image for post

I’ve been wanting to implement Storybook in my Nuxt.js projects for a while now.

For those who don’t know, Storybook is an open source tool for developing UI components in isolation. Check out its use cases.

Using Storybook with plain Vue.js is no hassle but it’s another story with Nuxt as it doesn’t work straight out the box. The info out there is disperse and I had to dig around other people’s repos and examples to have it working with Nuxt, including with how I usually make use of the Store.

I thought I’d write it down and make a more robust example repository for others out there who want to start using Storyboook with Nuxt. …

About

Lawrence B. Almeida

Interested in how tech influences us. Frontend developer @unbabel. I also run https://thoro.news and https://criticalfuture.tech. Views & opinions are my own.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store