Food Politics and Social Media is Shaping English Vernacular

Earlier this morning I got to thinking about how descriptive some of us are in our social media posting. For example, when we post a picture of a dish that we either just prepared or prepared for us, many of us are quite explicit in naming off every ingredient. I believe I’ve seen articles that made fun of this trend, relying on psychology to demonstrate how this is an issue of narcissism. I’ve seen articles in which we are demonstrating a class consciousness. As though, I eat quinoa and kale, but in my post I mention that it’s Eastern Andean Quinoa, and Bowl-Pit Missouri Kale over Southern Thai Jasmine Rice with Heirloom Squash out of the garden, and this demonstrates that I identify with a higher class of people than those who fast food, or non-artisan pizza without artichokes from a (gasp) franchise.


I want to suggest an anthropological perspective. Namely, we live in a relative gig economy for millennials. Many of us are working our way through life in the hospitality industry while we are going to school and trying to build a career as a freelancer on the side. We have to be descriptive about menu items. Having to market yourself with your own personal branding, goes hand in hand with the new dream job of actually being able to make a living as a food/makeup/travel/style blogger.

https://medium.com/@StevenHill1776/why-the-gig-economy-is-sputtering-a8342103ba88

Now, on top of this, I would also like to point out that those of us growing up in the information age, tightly integrated with technology as we are, we might be seeing a trend towards a more descriptive common English vernacular. Millennials are the most educated generation in history, and we also turn to Google to snag bits of information on the fly.

https://www.slideshare.net/brandonshockley37/mapping-the-millennial-path-topurchase-crc-2016

If I speak in a very concise and explicit manner, I am also giving my friends or audience keywords that they can use to search out more information for their own interests. In this sense, I am merely using food as an example. I think the underlying idea is equally applicable to talking about any number of specific products or activities that we use social media to discuss on a day to day basis.