Signs That You’ve Outgrown Github, Part 1: Labels

  • You’ve created so many labels that you’ve written a wiki page to tell everyone how to use them (and how NOT to use them!)
  • Maybe you want to keep track of bugs and support tickets separately.
  • Perhaps you don’t think that developers should be able to close a ticket just by committing code.
  • Maybe you’re tired of having to search in Google Docs, Basecamp, Slack and Github to find where you talked about that new feature.
  • Could be that you need to manage the relationships between tasks that depend on or block each other.

Labels

Labels are quick and easy to use, offer a lot of flexibility and require virtually no setup or configuration overhead. The default labels in Github look something like this:

Tools For Your Tools

In response to this widespread need, there are actually tools (like git-labelmaker) dedicated to helping Github users automate the creation and management of complex sets of labels, using different naming conventions, color schemes and labeling styles. Which is very cool — except that it seems like an awful lot of work to go through, doesn’t it? If someone has created a tool to help you use another tool, maybe it’s the wrong tool.

A Right-Sized Solution

Instead of a mashup of various labels, organized by a prefix word or a color scheme, consider this layout (with a few additions that are, IMO, obvious):

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