Why we should talk about anxiety

Or wait for an emotional implosion.

Photo by Callie Morgan on Unsplash

You’re so anxious and confused you don’t know what exactly your problem is (or problems are). Your mind so restless you can’t get proper rest and can’t think straight.

Seeking help takes a lot of courage. Am I incapable? Am I immature? Am I a failure? What if my boss find out? What will my family and friends think about me? … As if you don’t have enough things to worry about.

The growing anxiety issue is an elephant in the room. A taboo. Its existence seldom recognized.

So, what next?

You can let the anxiety monster incubate towards an emotional implosion.

Or, you can start talking about it.

Yes, it takes courage.

And yes, it’ll help. So much.

And of course, there are good reasons to talk about anxiety.

Because sometimes things sound dumber when said aloud. One small problem grows into one big problem, leading to other worries which grow into bigger worries. It goes on and on. In your mind. The first worry might be valid. But the later ones might no longer be supported by facts or actual reasons. They appear based on one another’s existence. Inside your skull. Not really logical. The chances of them actually happening are extremely low. But, without noticing, you dwell on. What’s scaring you and making you worried might just be your own mind. Talk with someone you trust. Tell them about those worries. When you say them aloud, you might find them ridiculous. When you think, you often forget to evaluate – listening closely to your inner voice and trying to make sense of it. When you speak, you usually filter your thoughts into something presentable and comprehensible for the listener. You say it aloud. You hear something dumb. You stop and rethink. You realize you’ve been spending time on vague worries.

Because your friends slow you down. Talk about your worries with friends you trust. They’ll see with another pair of eyes. They’ll think from a different angle, without your own subjectivity. Racing thoughts and worries might push you into doing crazy things. Talking with friends can slow you down and keep your feet on the ground, avoiding even heavier stress.

Because you’re not alone. Start talking with your friends about your worries, sadness, disappointment and anxiety. You’ll find that they have them too. It’s much more common than you’ve imagined. Some are depressed; some are anxious; some suffer chronic insomnia. Some are experiencing them now; some have such experience before. You’ll feel safer, calmer and warmer. We know how it feels like. We share on how to find ways to cope. We’ve got each other.

Because you may actually help someone. By talking about your anxiety, you’re opening up something that used to be hidden deep inside you. This is not something easy to do. Not everyone can do it. After revealing your anxiety, those who yet have the courage to do so, or yet realize they worry too much, will be able to understand more what it is all about and how they can cope.

Open up. You’ll feel better. You may be of help.

Bear in mind – you are the solution.