How the Internet mass produced everything I love

I’m 100% sure that Internet has had a lot of positive affects on society. Statement ended.

New sentence about the many other things the Internet has done that I do not necessarily feel are contributing to independent thinking and identity. It isn’t up to anyone to decide how others should identify or represent themselves, nor is it up to anyone to police what people think and what people say so I’m in no position to say how much the Internet should affect people’s thinking but inevitably it does and this is my piece.

It is not my sole purpose to spend so much energy pointing out the negatives or Cons or what you’s of the Internet when right now I’m using a platform on the Internet to share my self-riotous thoughts about a tool that has helped billions of people around the world in finding things they need, learning skills they may have perhaps taken longer to learn if it wasn’t for the Internet, to meeting people that have changed their lives. I would not dare to even begin to undermine how much the Internet has changed the world for the better. Perhaps my next post and also a personal pledge will be how I must use the Internet better. For this post I’m going to rant about how the Internet has mass produced everything that I love and lived.

We all have things that we love. Well I love art, I love everything creative (this doesn’t make sense but yeah I love creative energy manifested into objects of perceived beauty). Things that do not subscribe to the norms of society. I love things and people that push boundaries to show us a different view of the world, a skewed view as opposed to the perfect flat and straight view of the world. It is those such views that get me excited and inspire me to continue seeing the world that way, skew but perfect. It is not anyone’s responsibility to show anyone any view of the world. We decide on a view and everything is up to us. But the thing is that this energy thing flows, creative energy flows from that canvas hanging on some gallery to the person standing in front of it giving it new meaning and exchanging ideologies with the creator.

My place of refuge is going out to see what creatives around are doing. To feel the creative energy of the universe working through (that’s a bit dramatic but hey it is through creative energy that the Internet itself was created…) to be in a space where another human being has bared his soul for us all to see, learn from and feel. I don’t know if I’m going to the wrong spaces, visiting the wrong websites or I’m just nothing more than a critic but everything is starting to look too similar. It is all just too similar, the illustrations, the photos with Instagram look alike filters, the beats, the people, yes even the people are starting to look similar. The skew world suddenly straighten out, it got mass produced so quickly. When someone comes up with something fresh and just when you start appreciating it, the moment it goes into Instagram by the time you click to the next thing or look up something else hundreds of people have mass produced it. It is heart breaking. Like I said maybe I have developed a habit for not looking beyond what’s in front of me. Maybe everything is all right. I don’t know maybe I’m missing something. Maybe with so much content online and having seen so much everything does become similar. After all we are connected to the same source of energy, it’s just that it was a lot more interesting when I only knew one person that liked to wear a bennie a certain way or draw cartoons a certain way or shoot film in a certain style and mood, or tell stories in a certain tone. That unknowingness made me focus only on that one frame and I thought that one frame was everything, now there’s a thousand more frames everyday to look at that look exactly like that one that I thought was everything and now I’m confused. It’s hard to focus on one out of all and get the same connection I did from that one I thought only existed.

Maybe it isn’t about me, maybe it is. I don’t know.

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