Embedding Use Cases

A couple weeks ago, I blogged about Why Embedding Matters. A rendering engine can be put to a wide variety of uses. Here are a few of them. Which would you prioritize?

Headless Browser

A headless browser is an app that renders a web page (and executes its script) without displaying the page to a user. Headless browsers themselves have multiple uses, including automated testing of websites, web crawling/scraping, and rendering engine comparisons.

Longstanding Mozilla bug 446591 tracks the implementation of headless rendering in Gecko, and SlimerJS is a prime example of a headless browser would benefit from it. It’s a “scriptable browser for Web developers” that integrates with CasperJS and is compatible with the WebKit-based PhantomJS headless browser. It currently uses Firefox to “embed” Gecko, which means it doesn’t run headlessly (SlimerJS issue #80 requests embedding Gecko as a headless browser).

Hybrid Desktop App

A Hybrid Desktop App is a desktop app that is implemented primarily with web technologies but packaged, distributed, and installed as a native app. It enables developers to leverage web development skills to write an app that runs on multiple desktop platforms (typically Windows, Mac, Linux) with minimal platform-specific development.

Generally, such apps are implemented using an application framework, and Electron is the one with momentum and mindshare; but there are others available. While frameworks can support deep integration with the native platform, the apps themselves are often shallower, limiting themselves to a small subset of platform APIs (window management, menus, etc.). Some are little more than a local web app loaded in a native window.

Hybrid Desktop Web Browser

A specialization of the Hybrid Desktop App, the Hybrid Desktop Web Browser is notable not only because Mozilla’s core product offering is a web browser but also because the category is seeing a wave of innovation, both within and outside of Mozilla.

Besides Mozilla’s Tofino and Browser.html projects, there are open source startups like Brave; open-source hobbyist projects like Min, Alloy, electron-browser, miserve, and elector; and proprietary browsers like Blisk and Vivaldi. Those products aren’t all Hybrid Apps, but many of them are (and they all need to embed a rendering engine, one way or another).

Hybrid Mobile App

A Hybrid Mobile App is like a Hybrid Desktop App, but for mobile platforms (primarily iOS and Android). As with their desktop counterparts, they’re usually implemented using an application framework (like Cordova). And some use the system’s web rendering component (WebView), while others ship their own via frameworks (like Crosswalk).

Basecamp notably implemented a hybrid mobile app, which they described in Hybrid sweet spot: Native navigation, web content.

(There’s also a category of apps that are implemented with some web technologies but “compile to native,” such that they render their interface using native components rather than a WebView. React Native is the most notable such framework, and James Long has some observations about it in Radical Statements about the Mobile Web and First Impressions using React Native.)

Mobile App With WebView

A Mobile App With WebView is a native app that incorporates web content using a WebView. In some cases, a significant portion of the app’s interface displays web content. But these apps are distinct from Hybrid Mobile Apps not only in degree but in kind, as the choice to develop a native app with web content (as opposed to packaging a web app in a native format using a hybrid app framework) entrains different skillsets and toolchains.

Facebook (which famously abandoned hybrid app development in 2012) is an example of such an app.

Site-Specific Browser (SSB)

A Site-Specific Browser (SSB) is a native desktop app (or simulation thereof) that loads a single web app in a discrete native window. SSBs typically install launcher icons in OS app launchers, remove or minimize browser chrome in app windows, and may include native menus and other features typical of desktop apps.

Chrome’s — app mode allows it to simulate an SSB, and recent Mozilla bug 1283670 requests a similar feature for Firefox.

SSBs differ from hybrid desktop apps because they wrap regular web apps (i.e. apps that are hosted on a web server and also available via a standard web browser). They’re also typically created by users using utilities, browser features, or browser extensions rather than by developers. Examples of such tools include Prism, Standalone, and Fluid. However, hybrid app frameworks like Electron can also be used (by both users and developers) to create SSBs.

Linux Embedded Device

A variety of embedded devices include a graphical user interface (GUI), including human-machine interface (HMI) devices and Point of Interest (POI) kiosks. Embedded devices with such interfaces often implement them using web technologies, for which they need to integrate a rendering engine.

The embedded device space is complex, with multiple solutions at every layer of the technology stack, from hardware chipset through OS (and OS distribution) to application framework. But Linux is a popular choice at the operating system layer, and projects like OpenEmbedded/Yocto Project and Buildroot specialize in embedded Linux distributions.

Embedded devices with GUIs also come in all shapes and sizes. However, it’s possible to identify a few broad categories. The ones for which an embedded rendering engine seems most useful include industrial and home automation (which use HMI screens to control machines), POI/POS kiosks, and smart TVs. There may also be some IoT devices with GUIs.


Originally published at Mykzilla.