Welcome to the UCD Process!

Prototype Presentation

To give us a taste of the interaction design process, my colleagues and I participated in a UCD charrette. In the fast-paced design activity, our objective was to redesign smart vehicle interfaces to better suit certain driver demographics. My team’s focused specifically on babysitters, the acting children chauffeurs and temporary providers. What better way to assist babysitters than to have a built-in GPS with live-time traffic notification and ability to choose a route to get to multiple destinations. We wouldn’t have gotten to that solution without the design process.


Taking the First Step

We wouldn’t have proposed that design without the brainstorming stage. Any idea can be crazy or out-of-the-box, but sometimes those ideas can be part of the solution. Sticky notes were my best friends when I pumped out potential users and solutions. At the end of it, I couldn’t believe all those sticky notes decorating the whiteboard. It’s nice to have a visual of all those thoughts and organize them in different groups. There might’ve been even more great notions when we were given more time to brainstorm. Imagine what interesting thoughts we could’ve form within days instead of minutes.

The Brainstorming Board covered in sticky notes

Looking Forward

The charrette gave us a better understanding of what to expect when working on the next big product. Any design issues could adopt the UCD process, especially movies and other forms of entertainment. During the brainstorm phase, they could figure out their target viewers within the genre, as well as elements that would satisfy their audience. The activity also drew some important aspects that doesn’t have to be for developing a product such as communicating well with others, being able to present your proposal within the given time, whether it’s giving a gist of the application and its function in a swift minute or an infomercial in several minutes; and not being afraid to share all your ideas no matter if it sounds like it doesn’t relate to the problem at all. Who knows, maybe those outrageous ideas might be correlated to the users’ problems.

The Reflection Board