9 Ball-Busting Things You Should Know About Testicles

Last updated May 26, 2018 By MysteryVibe

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Following up from our 10 Things You Should Know About the Penis article, we felt that testicles weren’t getting enough of the limelight.

So, here’s some interesting things about testicles and why you need more ball stimulation in your sex life!

While they may not be the Beyoncé of the genitals, in our survey 50% said they incorporate ball stimulation into masturbation, and 87% said they like it when a partner plays with them.

So how about we give Kelly and Michelle (Beyoncé’s side kicks in Destiny’s Child for those who don’t know) a little extra care and attention?

[It is important to note that not all men have balls, and not all ball owners are men]

1. What do you like to call your testicles?

In our testicle survey, the overwhelming majority of you — unsurprisingly — said balls. Some were lucky enough to have multiple names for theirs.

“My wife calls them “balls”, but my girlfriend calls them the “boys”.”

Yet — even to the dismay of this anonymous respondent, “sorry, but I’m not 3. I just call them testicles or balls” — there were in fact plenty of people who have some pretty imaginative names for them.

For you fortunate fondlers, here’s a few of our favourites:

The sack of destiny; death stars 1 and 2; the family jewels; gonads; bollocks; cojones; Tom (Dick) and Harry; the twins; sugar lumps; plums; (meat &) two veg; eggs; nuts.

I don’t know about you, but the last few are definitely tempting our appetite. And now for the sexiest bit about the balls…

2. Testicle Anatomy

Scrotum and its contents. By OpenStax College, via Wikimedia Commons

  • Testes: plural of testis, are the male reproductive glands that produce both sperm and the male hormones testosterone and androgen. 75% say the left one hangs lower — so if you have ever wondered why they are asymmetrical, it’s to avoid causing friction and damage to each other.
  • Seminiferous tubules: these are a maze of coiled tubes inside the testes. These contain germ cells for making the sperm.
  • Cremaster: is a thin layer of muscle that covers the testis and the spermatic cord. An involuntary muscle that contracts and relaxes depending on temperature (for sperm survival), protection during sex, and to avoid injury during fight or flight.
  • Scrotum: is the outer layer of skin that holds everything in place, it is the same material as the vaginal outer lips (the labia majora).
  • Raphe: is the seam running down between the two testis, this is where the labia majora have fused together in the womb.
  • Epididymis: is the duct behind the testicles where sperm passes through to the ductus deferens.
  • Ductus deferens: a tiny muscular tube in the male reproductive system that carries the sperm to the penis.

For more on penis anatomy read our article on 10 Things You Should Know About the Penis.

3. Why are testicles important?

It’s safe to say that the balls play a pretty key part in reproduction. As sperm is produced in the testicles, they are arguably the fruit (or “plums”) of life. Did you know that a person can still function sexually with just one ball.

Looking after them is important, particularly by keeping them at their optimum temperature of 34 degrees celsius (a few less than body temp) in order for sperm to survive.

Avoid restrictive tight fitting underwear or trousers that can create unsuitable conditions for the “boys”. With this in mind, Joey Wears delivers comfortable “underwear your balls deserve”.

The testosterone produced by the testicles is important for genitalia development, deepening the voice, creating a strong jawline, bodily and facial hair, muscle growth and body size.

Testosterone is also essential for our libidos, increasing our sex drive — in all genders.

4. Are there any benefits to ball stimulation?

  • Improves blood circulation — which can improve the quality of an erection; some say regular massage can increase the length of the penis.
  • Identifies any irregularities — particularly any lumps or abnormalities. 6 out of 100,000 people are affected by testicular cancer, mostly in the age bracket of 22–36 years old.
  • Increases sperm count — which is good for procreation, but research has also shown that sperm has antidepressant effects for the receiving partner.
  • Stronger sperm — using rosemary oil as a massage lubricant is good for stronger sperm and studies suggest the oil can prevent cancerous cells forming; and could also add a nice aroma to the two meat and veg.
  • Boosting testosterone — massaging the balls regularly can boost sex drive.
  • More pleasure — because they are so vital to life, the testicles, and particularly the scrotum, have many nerve endings, making them “an additional erogenous area”.
“It enhances my experience of pleasure.”

5. What happens to the testicles during sex?

During the arousal period the testes double in size. This is because the blood vessels fill with blood, thickening the skin of the scrotum and filling the testis.

Closer to ejaculation, the testicles rise and sit closer to the body. 85% of men note the right rises before the left.

If you want to last longer during sex or practice edging (orgasm control), you can see how close ejaculation is by seeing how close the testicles are to the body.

According to Debra Fromer, MD, an assistant attending urologist at Hackensack University Medical Center “pulling down on his balls when you’re in the midst of passion delays ejaculation, prolonging his pleasure.”

At the point of ejaculation, the PC (Pubococcygeus also known as pelvic floor) muscles contract. This causes the sperm to travel from the testicles via the epididymis to the ductus deferens to be mixed with the seminal fluid, to reach the penis.

6. What are some “bootylicious” techniques for ball stimulation?

“How you would like them to be played with if at all?”
  • “GENTLY!”
  • “Don’t touch, please.”
  • “I like them spanked, flicked, and impact play.”

It is safe to say there is much variety when it comes to playing with balls. The key thing if playing with a partner’s balls is to be attentive and communicate. Gradually build sensation and back off if they look uncomfortable.

Don’t dive straight for them, but tease them into sex when arousal has already begun. Perhaps use your hands to “reach around during doggy style”, or use your tongue and lips during oral sex, or even have them on all fours and incorporate props to add sensation from behind.

Hands

Holding; cupping; caressing; stroking; tickling; pinching; tapping; light flicking; massaging.

Using your nails to scratch and tickle can provide a nice sensation, but be aware of their reactions. Many suggested that scrotum stimulation was a lot more favourable than the balls. Try a “firm tug” on the skin to expose more nerve endings. Another said they enjoy a “strong squeeze at point of orgasm”.

Mouth

Using your mouth can be especially pleasurable, but try not to “lose your breath”. You can use your tongue to lick the seam (or raphe) down the middle, a W motion from the left ball to the right, or a figure 8 around them both.

“Feels great when they’re gently sucked”

For edging, you should focus your mouth just on ball stimulation, and take away any attention from the shaft of the penis.

Props

Using lube provides a whole different sensation. Try temperature play, using cooling lube and heat lube to take it to the next level.

Perhaps incorporate butt plugs, perineum massagers and testicle vibrators.

Smart vibrators such as Tenuto have specific motors for ball stimulation. Using the MysteryApp you can create personalised vibrations.

7. What should be avoided during ball stimulation?

These “boys” are fragile things. With direct nerve endings connected to the stomach, the slightest wrong move can cause the person serious agony.

During ball stimulation, try to avoid any twisting; teeth and biting; too much pressure; tight squeezing; hard contact.

8. Are “blue balls” a myth?

After long periods of heightened sexual arousal, and if there is no ejaculation, the blood that flows to the penis causes a lot of pressure and pain in the testicles and they may show a tinge of blue. However, “blue balls” have not been scientifically proven to cause permanent damage.

Edging (orgasm control) can be a fun method of play, but do make sure the build up isn’t causing any discomfort to the balls.

9. Can testicle transplants work?

Testicle transplants are technically possible and can functionally work but ethical questions have been raised. Doctors specifically do not transplant testicles because that is where DNA is stored and so the germ cells will always make the sperm of the donor. If deceased donor’s testicles were used to conceive a child, this could count as a nonconsensual sperm donation.

For trans men undergoing gender reassignment surgery, doctors at this point in time can only offer Scrotoplasty where the labia majora are “dissected and then united to form a scrotum, during which implants may be put in to simulate testes”.

Be careful and have fun playing ball 😜

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