I read a post where Nabeel Tahir said that a simple LIKE will trigger the same feelings as Cocaine does from the sudden rush of euphoria.
Am I Addicted To Writing Or To Claps?
Tina Viju
7026

Dear Tina,
Very well written, and much gratitude for mentioning my comment.

In this pursuit, it’s survival of the fittest — we live in an age where mediocrity is often rewarded; we’re drawn to it because it’s invigorating to observe a world created our of fakery.

Take the examples of “Reality Television” for example, we realise it’s scripted; yet we tend to tune in anyways — largely because it’s how the script is designed to reel the audience in.
It’s an exposure of personalities we recognise.
Do realise, that viral success only lasts so long.
Creating a lasting impact, words that truly move people; is the greatest reward.
Whilst I will admit that I do have the luxury of being able to write and continue on this journey, without having to worry about my financial position for now; I do hope some day that this is the only thing I do have to contribute to.

The most wonderful of joy is not the claps, but the response it creates — a feeling of connection with the readers, which is why no matter how long it takes, I often take the time to respond back to the readers who do leave a comment on my articles.

The most rewarding gift of all is that you’ve created something, something personal, something honest, and having had the courage to share it with the world.
The “Cocaine” rush study was featured earlier in a few scientific studies — and is often cited as an example of the addictive nature of Social Media.

I write because for me, it’s the only way I’m able to communication; it keeps me sane.
For me that’s always been the greatest of pleasure.

Whilst it is certainly disheartening to have a piece you’ve devoted so much time to, doesn’t meet the expectation one was hoping for; do know that there is still a pleasure in creating something.

To share a piece that gets me through the rough days of my life, on days that I too feel down, on days that I feel if this pursuit will ever lead me anywhere worth recognition — I fall back to reading one of most wonderfully put statement by my favourite human being and writer of all time, Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

I often cite him as an example in my work, he is someone that I’ve always been drawn to — for his honesty and humility.

Hard-work pays off, it just takes a while. In times of trouble, do remember; adversity is a sign of growth. We learn about ourselves more so in these moments than we do in moments of success.

Imagine if success came too easy, if your very first article went viral — how different the pressure would be, how easy it would be to get lost in the glitter and glamour.

Look to Dave Chappelle as an example, who at the height of his fame walked away from it all.

Success often comes with a price too, it takes a piece of your soul — creative control if often lost.

It’s very easy to become a Content Prostitute, produce for the masses — there’s even courses for how to become a viral sensation.

It takes courage and vigour to portray an honest vision of your inner-self to the outside world and stand behind it with good reason.

Hence, I always ask myself this; Why do I write?

I wrote for survival, because without — I wouldn’t know how to remain sane in a world that I do not completely comprehend.

Every day is exciting for me, not because I’m checking my notifications; but because I’m excited for the message that I’ll be writing down today, leading me to publish daily — like an obsession.

Writing is my addiction, a healthy one at that.

A rewarding one, one that has brought me great pleasure and inner-peace.

The only way I know how to succeed is to keep pushing myself, and no matter how badly my articles perform — keep grinding. Because the audience can only ignore you for so long.

Trust me, when they notice; it will well be worth it. :)

On your Journey, I wish you all the best.

Warm Regards,
Nabeel Tahir.