Never stop asking questions

Since Mia was born I have been asking myself a lot of questions about parenting. What should I do when she cries? What should I do when she throws up? A lot of questions arise on a daily basis because I am a new parent and I don’t know a lot of things about parenting. So anytime I talk to the pediatrician and I say: “I have a lot of questions today!”, she replies with: “It’s normal that you have questions, you are a new dad!”.

I think that no matter how new or experienced you are at something, you should never stop asking questions. To me, that’s one of the best to improve in anything. Ask questions, reach for answers.

What should you ask?

Anything. Don’t have a filter to ask any kind of questions to yourself. Now, if you need to ask that question to somebody else, here is what I tend to do:

  1. Process the question internally, and think whether or not the answer has already been given.
  2. If the answer hasn’t been given, or you can’t recall. Ask it right away.

You should ask anything you want. Don’t ever think about whether or not the question is irrelevant, too simple, stupid, or whatever adjective people might put into it. Who cares? You have a question you want an answer for, that’s all that matters.

Why should you ask so many questions?

Because it’s one of our main mechanisms to learn. Do you remember when you were a kid? You used to ask questions about anything, without any filters. That was you learning, without thinking about whether or not you were asking a stupid question, or you were looking dumb.

Do you think Einstein gave a s*** about how silly his questions were when developing the theory of relativity? No, he didn’t. He was focused on his goal, not on how silly or not he would look with his questions.

In practice

Any time you find yourself wanting to find an answer for something that you don’t know, follow these steps:

  1. ASK THE QUESTION
  2. LISTEN FOR THE ANSWER

Go on with your life, you have learnt something new.

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