A data trust for Canada & the free flow of Gov’t data between inter-provincial borders? Inspiration from Denmark (April 2019)

Natalie McGee
May 15 · 15 min read

Also wanted specially thank a few colleagues who previewed this article, an embryonic idea, by generously sharing their time, expertise and knowledge. Thank you Anil Arora, Chief Statistician of Canada and DM of Statistics Canada, and to ISED’s resident expert on internal trade agreements, Stephen Fertuck and Charles Taillefer, a wiz on PIPEDA and all things Privacy. **la version française suit**

Intro

· On a recent study trip to Denmark, the highlights of which are well summarised by my colleague, Olivia Neal’s , I spent time with our Digital Government counterparts in the Agency for Digitisation, who are responsible for the implementation of the government’s digital ambition in the public sector.

· Coming from TBS Office of the Chief Information Officer, situated in the sector responsible for administrative leadership on digital tech and initiatives like the enterprise data strategy, I was struck by Denmark’s effective use of multi-party coalition agreements as intergovernmental contracts, which specify to varying degrees the procedures and policies of the coalition and how that translated to real action across the multiple levels of government.

· More particularly, how the Danish legislative agreement on basic data, contributed to the stability of a national data policy and created the conditions for intergovernmental consensus and cooperation on a number of concrete improvements and actions around good data for all; including the open publication, standards and sharing on public infrastructure.

· Sure, the Danes have the technology (a ‘Data Distributor’) bagged out, the common public services architecture defined and they have already done the hard work of cleansing and standardising the data.

· More than encouragement, what is needed in Canada may be binding, and legislative-enabling FPT agreement on the free flow of data between interprovincial borders, privacy respecting and security assuring of course, on common public infrastructure, set within the Canadian context of intergovernmental relations. Initially and minimally, for policy-making, program design or service delivery, or to create value for the public, private, not-for-profit, and research sectors — maybe later for companies.

· Read on for more, and please share your reaction or help expand my p.o.v.

Quick Facts: Government in Denmark

· The Kingdom of Denmark is a constitutional parliamentary monarchy.

· Legislative power is held by a unicameral (a legislative body having a single legislative chamber) parliament (Folketing).

· The local government in Denmark is composed of 5 regions and 98 municipalities — sound familiar?

· The 98 municipalities are responsible for handling most tasks related to citizen service delivery (decentralised), whereas Canada is a federated model (11 jurisdictions, plus 3 territories). The 5 regions are responsible for hospital care and health insurance, some elements of social affairs, regional development and coordination with business, tourism, transport and environment.

Denmark’s Rich History of Broad Political Agreements as National Policy Anchors

· Denmark has benefited from national, legislative enabling, agreements (like Canada’s FPT Canadian Free Trade Agreement (2017)), as key instruments/mechanisms based in law or statute, to spur intergovernmental cooperation.

· Danish national policy is traditionally based on such broad, consensus driven, political agreements.

· For example, in March 2012, the SRSF government entered into a historically broad and ambitious energy policy agreement with the Liberal Party, the Danish People’s Party, the Unity List and the Conservative People’s Party for the period 2012–2020.

· Essential parts of the legislation and the framework in the energy policy sector are based on agreements between changing Danish governments and the other political parties in the Folketing or between the government and the energy companies. The agreements have contributed to stability on energy policy

Data as Asset: “Good basic data for all”

· In the Report to the Clerk of the Privy Council: A Data Strategy Roadmap for the Federal Public Service (2018), the notion of data as a valuable public policymaking asset, available on common public infrastructure was advanced.

· Denmark, early in its efforts towards becoming the world’s best in e-government initiatives in the world, recognised this, too.

· The country introduced a “basic data program” that raises the quality of basic data, ensures consistency and makes data accessible to authorities, private companies and citizens. Basic data can be freely used by everyone and can be downloaded easily and securely via the data distributor.

· The basic data program originates from the multi-lateral agreement on “Good basic data for all”, which was concluded between the government and KL in 2012. In 2013, the Danish Regions joined the agreement. The program is governed by a joint public board, which is served by the basic data secretariat, which is located in the Digitization Board. The basic data program ensures correct basic data that is updated in one place and used by everyone.

· The Danish program has 8 open datasets in a central repository (the “Data Distributor”), that in near-real time, mirror the authoritative registries from different authorities such as: real estate, address, water resource management, geo-spatial, and business — but, more importantly that are scrubbed clean, normalised, standardised and structured in a public data architecture!

Coalition Agreements KEY to Enabling Intergovernmental Data Sharing for Better Services

· The benefit of such programs contributes to efficiency, modernization and better governance in the public sector, better public policy-making, as well as increased growth and productivity in the private sector.

· In Denmark, the “… basic data — is used again and again across the public sector. These basic data are the Foundation of that the authorities can perform their duties properly and thereby contribute positively to the effectiveness of the whole of society.

· Data is also of great value for the private sector. Partly because companies use these data in their internal processes, partly because the information in the public data can be used for completely new types of especially digital products and solutions. Good basic data is freely available to the private sector, is a source of innovation, growth and new jobs.”

· The Danish legislative agreement indicated consensus on a number of concrete improvements and actions around the basic data; including the open publication, standards and availability on public infrastructure, and include registrations of the Danes, their properties, companies, addresses and geography.

· It seems to me, without the broad legislative agreement at the national level, intergovernmental cooperation and concrete progress would not have resulted in as cohesive a way — the common ‘what’ and ‘why’ allowed the different levels of government to figure out the ‘how.’

Conclusions

· As the Data Strategy Roadmap notes, “how the Government of Canada collects, manages and governs data — and how it accesses and shares data with other governments, sectors and Canadians — must change”

· As seen by the example in Denmark, basic data are the foundation of how the authorities can perform their duties properly and thereby contribute positively to the effectiveness of the whole of society.

· Progress and the stability of Denmark’s data program are directly tied to coalition governance, set out by multi-lateral agreements, which enable legislation and indicate consensus around the rules for cross-border data management, and creates the national data trust available to all.

· In our Data Strategy Roadmap’s medium term and transition advice, we have committed to “provide regular updates on data to the Clerks and Cabinet Secretaries table, and encourage departments and agencies to pursue collaboration on specific issues or needs with other levels of government and Indigenous Peoples.”

· However, as we have seen from a recent Declaration on Public Sector Innovation, approved by Federal, Provincial and Territorial Clerks and Cabinet Secretaries in November 2017, “…encouragement, on its own, has not proven to be enough. Government processes, rules and structures must also support…”.

· Therefore, I suggest it’s time we treat ‘data’ as a valuable asset for the public good and elevate it as a key public policy issue. By matching-up today’s narrow idea of what internal trade matters are to the realities of the Digital Economy, and bringing together Canada’s most senior political leaders, at a federal/provincial/territorial First Ministers Conference or Meeting (FMMs) having aim to develop a Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) agreement on public data policy (similar to Denmark’s approach) we may be able move beyond encouragement alone.

· In treating data as an asset, much like oil or alcohol are in matters of Internal Trade, Canada stands to accelerate the resolution to how the Government of Canada collects, manages and governs data — and how it accesses and shares data with other governments, sectors and Canadians.

· I envision a binding, and legislative enabling FPT agreement on the free flow of data between interprovincial borders, privacy respecting and security assuring of course, on common public infrastructure, set within the Canadian context of intergovernmental relations. Initially and minimally, for policymaking, program design or service delivery, or to create value for the public, private, not-for-profit, and research sectors — maybe later for companies.

References

Fact sheet EU Join Up

Danish energy agreement of March 22, 2012 (in Danish).

Political agreements in the field of energy (in Danish).

Report to the Clerk of the Privy Council: A Data Strategy Roadmap for the Federal Public Service (2018)

UN E-Government Survey (2018)

The Basic Data Program

About the Data Distributor

Report to the Clerk of the Privy Council: A Data Strategy Roadmap for the Federal Public Service

DM Taskforce on Public Sector Innovation: Taking Stock One Year into the Renewed Mandate

Existe-t-il une unité administrative des données pour le Canada et une libre circulation des données gouvernementales entre les frontières interprovinciales? Inspiration du Danemark (avril 2019)

Nous tenons également à remercier tout particulièrement quelques collègues qui ont pris connaissance de cet article, une idée embryonnaire, en partageant généreusement leur temps, leur expertise et leurs connaissances. Merci à Anil Arora, statisticien en chef du Canada et sous-ministre de Statistique Canada, et à Stephen Fertuck et Charles Taillefer, notre expert d’Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada en matière d’accords sur le commerce intérieur, un génie de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques et tout ce qui touche la protection des renseignements personnels.

Introduction

· Lors d’un récent voyage d’études au Danemark, dont les points saillants sont bien résumés dans les Notes de Copenhague de ma collègue, Olivia Neal, j’ai passé du temps avec nos homologues du gouvernement numérique de l’Agence pour la numérisation, qui sont responsables de la mise en œuvre de l’ambition numérique du gouvernement dans le secteur public.

· En revenant du Bureau du dirigeant principal de l’information du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, situé dans le secteur responsable du leadership administratif en matière de technologie numérique et d’initiatives comme la Stratégie relative aux données intégrées, j’ai été frappé par l’utilisation efficace par le Danemark d’ententes de coalition multipartite comme contrats intergouvernementaux, qui précisent à divers degrés les procédures et les politiques de la coalition et la façon dont cela s’est traduit par des mesures concrètes à l’échelle des multiples ordres de gouvernements.

· J’ai été frappé plus particulièrement par la façon dont l’accord législatif danois sur les données de base a contribué à la stabilité d’une politique nationale sur les données et créé les conditions d’un consensus et d’une coopération à l’échelle intergouvernementale sur un certain nombre d’améliorations et de mesures concrètes concernant les bonnes données pour tous; y compris la publication ouverte, les normes et la communication de l’infrastructure publique.

· Bien sûr, les Danois disposent de la technologie (un « distributeur de données »), l’architecture des services publics communs est définie et ils ont déjà accompli le dur travail de nettoyage et de normalisation des données.

· Au-delà des encouragements, ce qu’il faut au Canada, c’est un accord fédéral‑provincial‑territorial (FPT) exécutoire et habilitant par voie législative sur la libre circulation des données entre les frontières interprovinciales, le respect de la vie privée et la sécurité, bien sûr, sur l’infrastructure publique commune, dans le contexte canadien des relations intergouvernementales. Initialement et minimalement, pour l’élaboration de politiques, la conception de programmes ou la prestation de services, ou pour créer de la valeur pour les secteurs public, privé, sans but lucratif et de la recherche, peut-être plus tard pour les entreprises.

· Continuez à lire pour en savoir plus. Veuillez faire part de votre réaction ou m’aider à élargir mon point de vue.

Faits en bref : Le gouvernement au Danemark

· Le Royaume du Danemark est une monarchie parlementaire constitutionnelle.

· Le pouvoir législatif est détenu par un parlement unicaméral (un corps législatif ayant une seule chambre législative) (Folketing).

· Le gouvernement local du Danemark est composé de 5 régions et 98 municipalités — ça vous dit quelque chose?

· Les 98 municipalités sont responsables de la plupart des tâches liées à la prestation de services aux citoyens (décentralisé), alors que le Canada est un modèle fédéré (11 administrations, plus 3 territoires). Les cinq régions sont responsables des soins hospitaliers et de l’assurance maladie, de certains éléments des affaires sociales, du développement régional et de la coordination auprès des entreprises, le tourisme, les transports et l’environnement.

La riche histoire du Danemark en matière d’accords politiques vastes en tant que points d’ancrage des politiques nationales.

· Le Danemark a bénéficié d’accords législatifs nationaux habilitants (comme l’Accord de libre-échange canadien FPT (2017)), en tant qu’instruments ou mécanismes clés fondés sur la loi, pour stimuler la coopération intergouvernementale.

· La politique nationale danoise est traditionnellement fondée sur des accords politiques aussi larges et consensuels.

· Par exemple, en mars 2012, le gouvernement de SRSF a conclu un accord de politique énergétique ambitieux et d’envergure historique avec le Parti libéral, le Danish People’s Party, le Unity List et le Conservative People’s Party pour la période de 2012 à 2020.

· Les parties essentielles de la législation et du cadre dans le secteur de la politique énergétique sont basées sur des accords entre les gouvernements danois changeants et les autres partis politiques du Folketing ou entre le gouvernement et les entreprises énergétiques. Les accords ont contribué à la stabilité de la politique énergétique.

Données en tant qu’actif : « De bonnes données de base pour tous »

· Dans le Rapport au greffier du Conseil privé — Feuille de route de la Stratégie relative aux données pour la fonction publique fédérale (2018), la notion de données en tant que précieux actif d’élaboration de politiques publiques, accessible sur l’infrastructure publique commune a été avancée.

· Le Danemark, dès le début de ses efforts pour devenir le meilleur au monde en matière d’initiatives de gouvernement numérique, l’a également reconnu.

· Le pays a lancé un « programme de données de base » qui améliore la qualité des données de base, assure l’uniformité et rend les données accessibles aux autorités, aux entreprises privées et aux citoyens. Les données de base peuvent être utilisées librement par tous et peuvent être téléchargées facilement et en toute sécurité par le distributeur de données.

· Le programme de données de base découle de l’accord multilatéral sur les « bonnes données de base pour tous », conclu entre le gouvernement et KL en 2012. En 2013, les régions danoises ont adhéré à l’accord. Le programme est régi par une commission publique mixte, qui est desservie par le secrétariat des données de base, qui relève de la Commission de numérisation. Le programme de données de base assure l’exactitude des données de base qui sont mises à jour au même endroit et utilisées par tous.

· Le programme danois compte huit ensembles de données ouvertes dans un dépôt central (le « distributeur de données ») qui, en temps quasi réel, reflète les registres faisant autorité de différentes autorités, comme l’immobilier, les adresses, la gestion des ressources en eau, l’espace géospatial et les affaires, mais, plus important encore, qui sont épurés, normalisés, normalisés et structurés dans une architecture de données publiques.

Les accords de coalition sont essentiels pour permettre l’échange de données intergouvernementales afin d’offrir de meilleurs services.

· L’avantage de tels programmes contribue à l’efficacité, à la modernisation et à une meilleure gouvernance dans le secteur public, à une meilleure élaboration de politiques publiques, ainsi qu’à une croissance et une productivité accrue dans le secteur privé.

· Au Danemark, les « … données de base — sont utilisées encore et encore dans le secteur public. Ces données de base sont le fondement permettant aux autorités d’accomplir correctement leurs tâches et ainsi contribuer positivement à l’efficacité de toute la société.

· Les données sont également d’une grande valeur pour le secteur privé. Cela est dû en partie au fait que les entreprises utilisent ces données dans leurs processus internes et en partie au fait que l’information contenue dans les données publiques peut être utilisée pour de nouveaux types de produits et de solutions, surtout numériques. Les bonnes données de base sont disponibles gratuitement pour le secteur privé et constituent une source d’innovation, de croissance et de nouveaux emplois. »

· L’accord législatif danois indique un consensus sur un certain nombre d’améliorations concrètes et de mesures concernant les données de base, y compris la publication ouverte, les normes et la disponibilité de l’infrastructure publique, et elles comprennent les enregistrements des Danois, leurs propriétés, leurs entreprises, leurs adresses et la géographie.

· Il me semble que, sans le vaste accord législatif au niveau national, la coopération intergouvernementale et les progrès concrets n’auraient pas permis de créer un climat durable et stable.

Conclusion

· Comme l’indique la Feuille de route de la Stratégie relative aux données, « La façon dont le gouvernement du Canada recueille, gère et gouverne les données — et la façon dont il y accède et les partage avec d’autres gouvernements, secteurs et Canadiens — doit changer. »

· Comme le montre l’exemple du Danemark, ces données de base sont le fondement permettant aux autorités d’accomplir correctement leurs tâches et ainsi contribuer positivement à l’efficacité de toute la société.

· Les progrès et la stabilité du programme de données du Danemark sont directement liés à la gouvernance de la coalition, établie par des accords multilatéraux, qui permettent d’appliquer la législation et indiquent un consensus sur les règles de gestion des données transfrontalières et créent l’unité administrative nationale des données accessible à tous.

· Dans les conseils à moyen terme et de transition de notre Feuille de route de la Stratégie relative aux données, nous nous sommes engagés à « fournir des mises à jour régulières sur les données au comité des greffiers et des secrétaires du Cabinet, et encourager les ministères et organismes à travailler en collaboration avec d’autres ordres de gouvernements et avec les peuples autochtones sur des enjeux ou des besoins précis ».

· Toutefois, comme nous l’avons vu dans une récente Déclaration sur l’innovation dans le secteur public, approuvée par les greffiers et les secrétaires de cabinet fédéraux, provinciaux et territoriaux en novembre 2017, « les encouragements, à eux seuls, ne se sont pas révélés suffisants. Les processus, règles et structures du gouvernement doivent également soutenir… »

· Par conséquent, je pense qu’il est temps que nous traitions les « données » comme un atout précieux pour le bien public et que nous en fassions une question de politique publique clé. En appariant l’idée étroite que nous avons aujourd’hui de ce que sont les questions de commerce intérieur aux réalités de l’économie numérique et en réunissant les plus hauts dirigeants politiques du Canada, lors d’une conférence ou d’une réunion fédérale-provinciale-territoriale des premiers ministres, qui vise à élaborer un accord fédéral-provincial-territorial (FPT) sur une politique de données publiques (semblable à l’approche du Danemark), nous pourrions peut-être aller au-delà de l’encouragement seulement.

· En traitant les données comme un actif, comme le pétrole ou l’alcool dans les questions de commerce intérieur, le Canada doit accélérer la résolution de la question de la « façon dont le gouvernement du Canada recueille, gère et régit les données, et de la façon dont il accède aux données et les communique à d’autres gouvernements, secteurs et aux Canadiens ».

· J’envisage un accord fédéral-provincial-territorial exécutoire et habilitant par voie législative sur la libre circulation des données entre les frontières interprovinciales, le respect de la vie privée et la sécurité, bien sûr, sur l’infrastructure publique commune, dans le contexte canadien des relations intergouvernementales, initialement et minimalement, pour l’élaboration de politiques, la conception de programmes ou la prestation de services, ou pour créer de la valeur pour les secteurs public, privé, sans but lucratif et de la recherche, peut-être plus tard pour les entreprises.

Fiche d’information EU adhésion

Accord danois sur l’énergie du 22 mars 2012 (en danois).

Accords politiques dans le domaine de l’énergie (en danois).

Rapport au greffier du Conseil privé : Feuille de route de la Stratégie relative aux données pour la fonction publique fédérale (2018)

Enquête de l’Organisation des Nations Unies sur le gouvernement numérique (2018)

Le Programme de données de base

À propos du distributeur de données

https://www.canada.ca/fr/conseil-prive/organisation/greffier/publications/strategie-donnees.html

Rapport au greffier du Conseil privé : Feuille de route de la Stratégie relative aux données pour la fonction publique fédérale (en anglais seulement)

Groupe de travail des SM sur l’innovation dans le secteur public : Bilan d’un an après le renouvellement du mandat

Natalie McGee

Written by

#GC #GCDigital #GCnumérique @TBS_Canada Public servant. A purveyor of simple and direct advice. Gets stuff done. Mechanical engineer, formerly with Toyota.