This story is unavailable.

The New Yorker issue with a cartoon of Trump on the cover has an article by a writer who spent some time in West Virginia, where there is a lot of support for Trump.

There are issues where the West Virginians are delusional. Coal will never come back, at least not as a fuel that is burned in power plants. This is an issue that is larger than any presidential candidate. But the West Virginians have some valid grievances.

During election years the Democrats claim that they are the champion of working people. Then while in office they sell them out. Maybe not as much as the Republicans, but someone is paying all that money into the Democratic election coffers. Those someones are listened to when it comes to drafting legislation.

Some of the people the author of the New Yorker article interviewed resent the fact that hundreds of billions of dollars were spent in Iraq and nothing was spent on infrastructure in West Virginia (of course that was due to “W”, not a Democrat).

Trump has been willing to say things that other politicians will not say. This resonates with his supporters. Some in West Virginia complain about the tiny number of radical Muslim Imams who preach against the United States, from within the United States. Why are they here if they don’t like the country? Or immigrants who refuse to join the mainstream of American culture (whatever that is). In the New Yorker article the author interviewed a man of Syrian Arab descent who pointed out that his ancestors renounced their countries and culture when they became Americans.

Many of these reactions are too complex issues that have been simplified or falsified through the lens of Fox News (e.g., Fox News: there’s lots of radical Imams, Sharia law is being imposed in parts of the United States). But there are also areas of valid concern. The Democrats should not ignore these issues. Ignoring them will not make they go away. Trump may not win this election, but the Republican party has been changed. Mike Pence will be back in 2020.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.