When you’ve got so many options that you become overwhelmed and instead do nothing at all.

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When I graduated from the first-ever Houston cohort at DigitalCrafts, I was elated about the future. “I’m a full-stack developer now! I have so many options!” I thought. But as I started perusing job openings, I started to lose that enthusiasm. Each job listing asked for something different, a different technology, a different framework, a different meaning of ‘full-stack’ even. And everything seemed so cold, so… not me.

I then decided I wanted to set out on my own and try freelancing for a while. And that’s when it really hit me. Was I going to pursue developing entire websites? I don’t like backend work. How would I set up dynamic sites with no backend? I really like CSS, maybe I could just focus on web design? That’s kind of a dying area with all the DIY design options out there now, do I really want to deal with that? The pay is getting more and more scant by the day. Maybe I could do UX? Well they never really taught any of that at code school, so wouldn’t that mean you’d have to learn a whole new skillset? I like video games, maybe I could do UI design for games? Hm, then I’d have to learn Unity, yeah? That’s a lot on it’s own. Maybe I could build and maintain static websites for clients? Yeah but then you’d have to deal with a lot of non-technical people and then you’d be tied to updating these people’s sites FOR-EV-ER. Not to mention the infinite back-and-forth emails that most of the time go nowhere. …


And making sure your self-critique isn’t self-abuse.

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Despite having started numerous endeavors, written countless pieces, and created many types of art, I have a wildly disproportionately small amount of finished product out in the world. While part of that can be blamed on many external factors, the largest culprit is certainly my own perfectionism. And it’s not even perfectionism, really. I never strive to make things perfect, I just almost never feel like the finished product is good enough.

On September 12 at 11am, Grammy-winning jazz artist Esperanza Spalding began live streaming her effort to conceptualize, write, and record a 10-track album in 77 hours. This is a process that most artists take months to complete, and she was condensing this into a few days and streaming the whole ordeal to hundreds of thousands of people on Facebook Live. …

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