Instagrim: Why Social Media Makes Students Miserable

Social media has evolved into two broad branches — One is the Facebook, LinkedIn type where a person will only share conforming material with others and second is Snapchat, anonymous handles at Twitter where people will hold nothing under the guise of anonymity. This is an insightful needull which talks about how social media has evolved.

This pressure has driven some of them to new platforms, where they can let off steam. They gushed about Snapchat, where posts disappear in seconds, and about pseudonymous profiles on Tumblr, Twitter, and Yik Yak. Students long to play around online, to be creative and even inappropriate, and the freedom to do so lies in anonymity. As a result, we’re seeing the rise of a bifurcated social-media universe: one with accounts attached to one’s name and brand, and the other of pseudonyms where uninhibited expression — and, yes, vile and vulgar rhetoric — reigns.
The problem with the self-as-brand social media is the dissonance it breeds. We’ve taught our kids to hide the whole truth of who they are online — even as we’ve instilled in them the importance of “being yourself” growing up. Thus the self-branding mind-set that defines social-media use among the young doesn’t make them happy. It mostly just makes them stressed.

The complete article

Donna Freitas — The Chronicle of Higher Education

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Originally published at on May 14, 2017.

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