11/16 Design for Intent Workshop

Design for Intent cards for persuasive design

During our Seminar 1 class on Wednesday, guest lecturer, Prof. Dan Lockton, talked about the need for of design intent card and applications. He showed us various examples of these cards are being used in various ways by different groups of people. The presentation was followed by a workshop where we teamed up to analyze our design in detail and use the cards to move the design process further. We started thinking about the main behavior changes we envision through this project. Since the project has a lot of historical value and its location is prime, being in the heart of the city, we want it to be utilized to its maximum potential. Since, it is in the commercial zone, we expect people to visit during the lunch hours to gather. From our field trip we understand that presently it is under-utilized, and we think that by making the space more discoverable and providing easy access to everyone can bring in more people to enjoy and relax in this space.

Then, we discussed about the “assumptions” we made about our users while designing the solution., which are listed in the picture below. Most of our assumptions have been validated during our field research and hence, we feel confident about them.

We then used few of these cards to generate ideas for the project. Apart from the solutions we had thought about, we were able to leverage on some new ones through this exercise. The design intent cards provided many ideas of improving out original idea, e.g. using contrast, bundling, thinking about positioning etc. It also helped generate new ideas that can be applicable in pour scenario, e.g. providing feedbacks through forms, idea of mazes, making memes etc. We also thought about the idea of building a toolkit in which our solution of seatings can inform users in various neighborhood in Pittsburgh and maybe around the world. Finally, we talked about the values and ethics our solution is generating and whether we need to reconsider any part of it.

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