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Photo by Rafael Leão on Unsplash

In the wake of the global COVID-19 outbreak, nations the world over are feeling strain as their economies grind to a halt. Chief among the factors affecting the fiscal slowdown are quarantines, which have frozen consumer demand, and a massive drop in travel.

Seemingly overnight, the world is now facing a looming economic crisis that very well may dwarf the “great recession” of 2008. While monetary pain will be inflicted across the globe, countries with outstanding debt seem to be the most poised to suffer from a fallout.

Amid the international emergency moves to combat the virus, Argentina has announced…


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(Flickr / Eric Molina CC BY 2.0)

An outbreak of HIV cases in a rural West Virginia may paint a foreboding future for the rest of a nation trying to grapple with the crisis of opioid abuse.

Cabell County, which nestles the Ohio border, has seen a tally of 74 cases since January of 2018, according to a report from Politico. The vast majority of these cases are the result of needle-sharing by drug users.

Cabell County, which boasts a population of 96,319 as of the 2010 census, has also served as a laboratory in efforts to combat the damaging effects of the growing opioid epidemic in…


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The flag of New Mexico waves against a cloudy backdrop (photo courtesy: usflagstore.com)

Marijuana legalization continued its roll on Saturday, after New Mexico’s House Health and Human Services committee voted to advance House Bill 356. The proposal passed the committee on a party-line vote of 5–2, with all Democrats supporting the legislation.

The bill would allow for the legalization, taxation and regulation of recreational cannabis at the state level. The bill also embraces more sweeping criminal justice reforms, such as expunging criminal records for previous marijuana charges, according to the Albuquerque Journal. …


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Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash

Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) has rolled out a plan this week that would end the prohibition of marijuana at the national level. The bill, aptly titled S.420, would remove the substance’s listing as a Schedule One drug, meaning it has been deemed to have no medical purposes by the government.

The bill, colloquially known as the Marijuana Revenue and Regulation Act, would also prohibit the federal government from interfering with markets in states that have already legalized the substance, according to Gizmodo.


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Free stock image of the inside of a prison

The national political discourse is rapidly evolving on issues once thought to be fringe. Ideas like Medicare-for-All, tuition-free college and heavily taxing the rich were considered taboo not too long ago, yet today they all enjoy majority support, according to most polling numbers.

Another policy that has surged in popularity is the idea of repealing the prohibition of marijuana, and legalizing it for recreational use. According to recent polling from Gallup, 64% of Americans support legalizing cannabis on a federal level. This polling also reflects a sprouting bipartisan consensus, with a majority of Democrats, Independents and Republicans favoring the idea.


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In a case of rare, beneficial bipartisanship this week, several elements of the federal government have given smokers a reason to spark some optimism.

Bipartisanship in Washington, D.C. is rarely a good thing — but over the past week, it has helped give weed a big bump.

It was perfect timing for President Donald Trump, who announced on Friday, the 13th of April, that he would leave cannabis legalization efforts to individual states. This would allow state-wide marijuana industries to operate without fear of reprisal from federal authorities.

The move was especially surprising, given that the president’s attorney general, Jeff…


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By: Nathan Elliott (Originally Published: 9/17/2017)

The year 1991 will forever be etched in history books as the year that the Soviet Union collapsed, signaling a clear victor of the Cold War. And as the USSR and its satellite states dissolved one-by-one, so too did the Warsaw Pact, a collective defense treaty for Soviet-aligned states.

This brought an end to the nearly five-decade long standoff between the ideologically-opposed superpowers of the globe. …


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Although it may seem counter-intuitive to some, fully legalizing all drugs is the only way to effectively reduce crimes related to the substances. Here’s Why.

By: Nate Elliott

Constant messaging has been something lacking in the current administration occupying the White House, but of the amorphous principles of the president, one theme has held steady — cracking down on border crime stemming from the drug war, which has always been his go-to position to appease his base.

During President Trump’s 2018 State of the Union address, he made a point to wear out his favorite punching bag, the Salvadorian gang…


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A photograph of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge. (Wikimedia Commons)

The year was 1969 and the anti-war movement against American intervention in Vietnam was in full swing. Richard Nixon had just entered office after a whopping victory in the presidential election, and he was already swamped in the country’s most turbulent foreign policy situation since the Korean War.

Facing an enormous backlash to the country’s illegal invasion of a country that did nothing to harm the United States, Nixon sought to squash the opposition by targeting protesting dissenters.

And what was the boogeyman with which he could demonize them? …

Nate Elliott

DC-based writer focusing on economics, policy and culture

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