In Pennsylvania and other battlegrounds, both parties are succeeding in coaxing infrequent voters off the sidelines. The all-important question is who does it better.

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Voters wait in line outside Philadelphia City Hall on the final day to cast their early voting ballots at the satellite polling station on October 27, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

By Trip Gabriel

GREENSBURG, Pa. — At 32, Ryan Walsh has never voted in a presidential election. He didn’t identify with either party before this year. But in the spring, he registered as a Republican, and he plans to cast a ballot in person Tuesday for President Donald Trump.

“I’m petrified of Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi getting power and doing all this stuff that’s going to totally destroy the economy,” said Walsh, who works for a social services agency of state government.

He cited a string of proposals that trouble him — broad tax increases, the Green New Deal, “Medicare for All” — that Biden has said he opposes. …

The New York Times

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