The Rauschmonstrum & John the Baptist

The following is a passage from The Gospel of the Rauschmonstrum.

The Rauschmonstrum came upon John the Baptist in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.

The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to hear his message. They confessed their sins to him and he baptized them in the Jordan River.

John wore clothing made out of camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist. He ate wild honey and locusts.

“What should we do?” the crowds often asked him.

John would answer, “He who has two shirts should share with the one who has none, and he who has food should do the same.”

Even the tax collectors came to him to be baptized. “Teacher,” they would ask, “What is it we should do?”

“Never collect any more than you are required to,” he told them.

Then some soldiers asked him, “And what should we do?”

He replied to them, “Do not extort money and do not accuse people falsely. It would be wise of you to be content with your pay.”

The people all waited keenly. They were all wondering in their hearts and minds if John might possibly be the Messiah.

The Rauschmonstrum understood the power John had on those who came to see him. “They look at him, and they conceive of him as a god. This man has the qualities I am looking for.”

But then the Rauschmonstrum heard John say something that made him curious, for John said:

“After me there will be another more powerful than I, I will not be worthy to untie the straps on his sandals. I may baptize you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

While the Rauschmonstrum did not know what John was referring to when he mentioned the Holy Spirit, it was evident that what John said had energized the crowd.

“This John knows of someone who is even better than he is at what he does?” The Rauschmonstrum thought. “I must meet this man.”

More Rauschmonstrum themed stuff can be found on my site www.Rauschmonstrum.com

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