The NCSS Challenge is here again, which means you and your students can join thousands of others learning to solve problems with code!

Yes. This is exactly how excited you should be feeling right now

Over five weeks, your students will be Challenged (see what we did there? 😉) to solve problems with code. They’ll learn how to do so by working through our interactive notes, and if they have questions or get stuck, they can ask our friendly tutors for help!

There are lots of different streams for students of all experience levels, from coding first-timer to old hat. You can read more about which stream is right for your students…


Students at the NCSS Summer School

For more than a decade, the NCSS Challenge has taught students across the world how to solve problems with code. We’ve covered everything from Pacman to Prolog, sandwiches to satellites, teaching programming, problem solving, and computational thinking. Each year, we write new questions and tweak our courses based on teacher feedback. And this year, we’ve got some exciting changes in store!


Every state and territory other than NSW is teaching digital technologies as a subject in 2018. Shutterstock

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Australian schools are now wrestling with a new digital technologies curriculum. In this new subject, every student in Australia will learn the fundamentals of computer science, data science and coding.

This curriculum change is long overdue. Australian students ranked last in tech skills and interest in technical jobs according to a 2016 report produced for the World Economic Forum, across a global sample of countries.

The lack of capability in STEM is evident in the downward trend of PISA scores in science and mathematics, identified in the recently…


Every state and territory other than NSW is teaching digital technologies as a subject in 2018. Shutterstock

Australian schools are now wrestling with a new digital technologies curriculum. In this new subject, every student in Australia will learn the fundamentals of computer science, data science and coding.

This curriculum change is long overdue. Australian students ranked last in tech skills and interest in technical jobs according to a 2016 report produced for the World Economic Forum, across a global sample of countries.

The lack of capability in STEM is evident in the downward trend of PISA scores in science and mathematics, identified in the recently published Australia 2030: Prosperity Through Innovation Plan.

The digital technologies subject adds…


So you want to get started with the ACA Digital Technologies Challenges? Great! Here’s our step by step guide to get you and your class coding in no time!

Step 1: Become a verified teacher

The first step is to set up an account on Grok Learning, and request teacher verification. If you’ve signed in using your school credentials, you might even be automatically verified!
Being a verified teacher will let you see the progress of students at your school, on the teacher dashboard.


Image courtesy the University of Sydney

The national Digital Technologies curriculum poses a mammoth challenge for teachers across the country. Around 3.3 million students across Australia will be learning computer science, technology and computational thinking skills in a brand new subject. Supporting teachers is critical to ensuring this quite ambitious curriculum’s success. Grok Learning is proud to be partnering with the Australian Computing Academy, an initiative of the University of Sydney and the Australian Federal Government, in supporting this endeavour.

Last week, the Academy launched the Australian Digital Technologies Challenges for years 5 and 7. These are in-classroom activities hosted on the Grok Learning platform, with…


We’ll be bringing you tips, updates and stories about coding, computer science, and solving problems that matter. But first, let’s get acquainted.

Grok Learning’s mission is to teach the world to code, support teachers with engaging computing activities for the classroom, and to share our passion for learning. Grok was founded in 2013 by a team of educators from the University of Sydney. James and Tara were academics in computer science and astronomy; and Nicky and Tim were PhD students with a passion for computer science outreach and education.

The four have been the driving force behind the National Computer…

Nicky Ringland

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