Beyond who said what: Mapping Twitter trends of Yakub Memon’s final week

by Nishith Sharma

Yakub Memon died today. A story that ran for more than two decades has come to its end. Whether it was justice enough or not will be a matter of opinions forever. But we have tried to find out what did people talk about Yakub during the last week he was alive.

Frrole, a social intelligence company, has analyzed all the tweets posted about Yakub, and has come up with interesting insights, some of which are not so obvious. Here is a look at how Twitterati reacted in the past week:

How much and how often?
Yakub Memon was mentioned more than 200,000 times in the last 7 days with a potential reach of almost 3 billion users. The no. of times people spoke about him was at peak on July 26th, between 5 and 6 pm, right after Salman Khan clarified about the misunderstanding his tweet might have created. More than 6500 tweets were created in that one hour.

The 2nd peak was more continuous, starting on 29th July at 4 pm, and going on till the 30th morning — generating more than 3000 tweets per hour on average.

How far?
The potential reach of the tweets, though has been fairly low on all days, except on the last one day. While 26th July saw a jump in potential reach reaching almost 69 million users, it was mostly reactions of average Indian people, and not influencers. In the last one day, on the other hand, the potential reach of tweets about Yakub has been on the rise constantly, reaching to more than 160 million people between 7 to 8 am.

How was it worded?

The sentiment has been fluctuating constantly in the range of 20% to 40% positive on an average being close to 30% supportive over the last 7 days. What this means is that 30% of the tweets about Yakub have been using positive terms like “forgive” or “justice”, while 70% have been using negative terms like “punish” or “terrorist”.

An example of a positive tweet: Victims of Bombay Bomb blasts 1993 finally got justice today with the hanging of terrorists Yakub Memon.” An example of a negative tweet: “Yakub Memon Hanged.. a really tragic moment for the indian sc.. a disappointing decision… #DeathForYakub #IndiaToday #RIPYakubMemon.

An interesting insight here is that for the tweets posted by non-media accounts, the usage of positive terms is 28%, while tweets posted by media accounts have a positive usage of about 32% — indicating that an average Indian has been more damning about Yakub.

What were the keywords? Not surprisingly, the keyword that was used most often while mentioning Yakub was ‘terrorist’ with 7300 mentions. The more surprising fact is that the second most associated keyword was ‘innocent’, mentioned 6400 times, only 12% less than the total mentions of ‘terrorist’. Supreme Court, Muslim, Guilty, Salman Khan, Tiger Memon, Faith, System were other top keywords associated with Yakub.

Apart from Salman Khan and Tiger Memon, other famous personalities that were mentioned the most along with Yakub were B.Raman (1114), Salim Khan (594), Abdul Kalam (490), Naseeruddin Shah (479), Mahesh Bhatt (387), Pritish Nandy (237) and Subramanian Swamy (173). Amaresh Misra @AmareshMisraFC was the most vocal account mentioning Yakub Memon 320 times in the last 7days.

Where were they tweeting from? Mumbai led the conversations generating almost 25% of the tweets about Yakub. New Delhi was close second with 22% of the share of voice. Other most vocal cities have been Chennai (13%), Bengaluru (9%), Hyderabad (4.6%), Pune (4.5%) and Kolkata (4.3%). Among foreign cities, London leads the pack, with a little less than 3% share of voice. Male users posted 76% of the tweets, while 24% of the tweets — a percentage higher than usual in India — were by female users.

Nishith Sharma is co-founder of Frrole, a social data-as-a-service company that mines deep insights from social conversations and makes them available via its data feeds and dashboard applications.

Originally published at www.firstpost.com on July 30, 2015.

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