House Rabbit

It often comes as a surprise to those who, when they think of pet rabbits at all, picture them outdoors in hutches or worse [video NSFB — Not Safe For Bunnies], that they can live quite happily inside with the humans. They can usually be litter-trained and are odour-free: both big pluses. And they are incomparably adorable. Meet Oreo, as we first met him at about 10 weeks:

you got me at a garden centre?

He’s now 16 months old, and has the run of most of his new castle,

we didn’t have nice pillows like this back at the centre

the exceptions being the kitchen and the bathroom. For a while he was also barred from the storage room where his hay is kept, but that didn’t last long.

thank goodness I don’t have hay fever

Aside from hay — we get ours by the bale from a local farmer; much of it ends up scattered on the floors, just like in medieval times—rabbits also dig their greens.

and reds, it looks like

The main order of business for anyone wishing to share heart and hearth with leporidae domesticis

spot the lagomorph

is to bunny-proof your own hutch. This involves safeguarding electric cords, which rabbits appear to be more fond of than carrots, and restricting access to books or whatever your new housemate fancies.

looking for the fireplace to go with the screen
paper towel rolls: très chic, non?

Still, you must prepare yourself for the inevitable small nibbles that start appearing in home furnishings.

thanks for the assist

And they will. Go. Everywhere.

that’s one small step for you, one giant leap for the likes of me
it was in the way

Rabbits are crepuscular, which means they’re most active in the mornings and evenings

behind the couch is apparently much more comfy than on it

but really, once you’ve let a rabbit in, he’s liable to scamp about in your head 24/7.

am I on your contacts list?

Wonderful as it is having him in our lives, he’s a lot of work and worry. When rabbits are sick they can go downhill very fast, so you’ve got to keep a close eye on them. As a prey species, most don’t particularly like being held, so many people’s reason for wanting one in the first place (lots of hugs, of course!) goes right out the window. But he’s an appreciative magnet for pets, grinding his teeth in approval — a satisfying reward known as ‘tooth purring’. All in all, we’re glad he’s ours and we’re his.

works for me

Like rabbits? More here

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