One of the life lessons I retained from my mum was that, when you’re interviewing with a company one must remember that you are also interviewing that company.

This is a lesson that I frequently forget during the stressful experience of interviewing with a new team, particularly if I am sitting on a call or in an in-person meeting without my notes handy. Maybe in the future I (and yourself) can just pull up this blog post :)

How I feel when asked, “If I have any questions”

When I typically get to the end of an interview, I feel rushed to ask questions, particularly if within a 30 minute…


“In December 2016 I became an orphan, before the age of 30. I wasn’t with my parents when either of them passed away. Neither of them will be there for any of my ups and downs in the future years…”

I have thought about writing with some version of the above many times. Yet, frequently I do not.

This is an emotionally evocative topic. One I have spent time journaling, talking with folks about, and sitting with alone or in therapy with a professional.

When this topic comes to mind these days it is closely followed by the voice in…


In my life there is a house
An empty house with many rooms
I wander through this house
Uncomfortable with it as my home

I have lived here for awhile
Each room full of memories
Items touched and loved
Faded smells and decaying textures

I do not live with anyone
Though there are people here
In each room I sense them
Painful to cross their thresholds


This post was originally a TweetStorm. Read that tweetstorm.

This post is part of a group I’ve written about improving your version control skills.

I’ve had some serious level ups in my git workflow as I’ve continued working as a developer.

Currently my git workflow focuses on a few things:

  • Small staccato commits that come together to tell a story
  • Using feature branches
  • Writing great pull requests

No fear of committing

The habit of regular small (even trivial) commits, was baked into me while going through Dev…


This post was originally a TweetStorm. Read that tweetstorm.

This post is part of a group I’ve written about improving your version control skills.

I’m pretty sure that squashing commits is now going to be a part of my git workflow. I’ve had some serious level ups in my git workflow as I’ve continued working as a developer. This is definitely one of them.

The habit of regular small (even trivial) commits, was baked into me while going through Dev Bootcamp in Chicago…


This post was originally a TweetStorm. Read that tweetstorm.

This post is part of a group I’ve written about improving your version control skills.

Why you should write great pull requests

Having strong git skills are essential as a developer. Leveling up these skills involves a diverse set of talents.

One area where I feel there’s room for easy improvement is within contextual and descriptive pull requests.

By including additional context you make the life of those reviewing your pull request easier, enabling faster and better code review.

What to include

In my…


At what point does distribution of content have diminishing returns?

Recently, I’ve started to tweetstorm, I do so in order to quickly gather feedback, create an open conversation and most significantly to execute on writing with the method I’d use “if it looked easy”.

I hope to write more about this soon.

From that initial creation, those tweetstorms usually continue to progress as posts on my personal website. Then becoming new posts for Medium and LinkedIn, part of my burgeoning newsletter. Eventually I share the now edited,fleshed out tweetstorm/blog posts again across the relevant networks.

As I continue doing so…


This article is the third in a series of three in which I explain some of what I’ve learned about JavaScript Inheritance and JavaScript Prototypes.

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 1)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 2)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 3)

You can find the code for this series here.

How does a JavaScript Constructor inherit from another Constructor?

If you’ll remember from my last post, JavaScript is a prototype-based language. By using prototypes we can duplicate behaviors and attributes from existing objects (prototypes). If we would, we can imagine the prototype object as a blueprint for your other objects.

Let’s recap the code…


This article is the second in a series of three in which I explain some of what I’ve learned about JavaScript Inheritance and JavaScript Prototypes.

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 1)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 2)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 3)

You can find the code for this series here.

How does a JavaScript Object inherit from Constructor?

JavaScript is a prototype-based language. By using prototypes we can duplicate behaviors and attributes from existing objects (prototypes). If we would, we can imagine the prototype object as a blueprint for your other objects.

Let’s see this in action! Follow along in your node REPL


This article is the first in a series of three in which I explain some of what I’ve learned about JavaScript Inheritance and JavaScript Prototypes.

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 1)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 2)

Basics of JavaScript Prototype-based Inheritance (Part 3)

You can find the code for this series here.

How does JavaScript do Inheritance?

JavaScript as a loosely-typed dynamically-typed language gives us a alternative method for Inheritance when compared to languages such as Java, C, or Ruby.

If you’re familiar with Ruby, then you know that it utilizes a Class Inheritance paradigm. JavaScript is a class-free object-oriented language. …

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