“What is generally known as discipline in traditional schools is not activity, but immobility and silence. It is not discipline, but something which festers inside a child, arousing his rebellious feelings.” (Montessori, Creative Development in the Child Vol. 2, p.41.)

Real life experiences that allow children to explore with their senses is the basis of Montessori’s philosophy on education.

Freedom and discipline are naturally at odds in the conventional system of rearing or educating children, a child only obtains freedom from the adult after a show of discipline which usually involves immobility and silence. These two requirements of discipline are at their core in direct opposition to the child in the first plane (ages 0–6) and their sensitive period…


Background

Before I earned a M.ed and an AMI diploma my passion for educating and children had led me down a different, yet relevant, path; I was a children’s yoga instructor. I was a children’s yoga instructor before it was really popular and the benefits of practice were well documented. …


“The child’s development follows a path of successive stages of independence, and our knowledge of this must guide us in our behaviour towards him. We have to help the child to act, will and think for himself. This is the art of serving the spirit, an art which can be practiced to perfection only when working among children.” (Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 257)

taking time for mindfulness

The Montessori adult is commissioned with the task of leaving their past history behind, recognizing the different ways a child functions within the environment, and learning how to best present themself in order to best…


Three year olds working with the number rods, a concrete manipulative isolating the idea of quantity, based on a previous visual work refining perception of graded change.

Children in the Primary Class, or Children’s House (Casa), in a Montessori school are at the peak of a growth cycle both physically, and philosophically in Montessori terms. From ages 0–3 the child is self-creating, engaging with their environment, taking in all that their senses can absorb and figuring out the world around them piece by piece. A colleague in training once mentioned that Montessori’s philosophy of development made a great deal of sense to her, especially when discussing infantile amnesia, which is defined as “the inability of adults to retrieve episodic memories before the age of 2–4 years, as…


Going back to school after a vacation can be difficult and parents who are looking to lessen the pushback can take steps to help their child develop independence, an understanding of expectations and grace and courtesy.

Children in Montessori’s First Plane of Development (ages 0–6) benefit from continuous structure and schedule. School breaks provide novel stimulation and a vacation from routine, which realistically cannot be maintained. Many adults would love to stay in their vacations; exotic warm climates, snorkeling, or hiking throughout the days, who wouldn’t? But adults have fully developed brains and understand the need to return to structure…


Before the backseat was filled with handheld gaming devices, pads and pods, how did children spend their time in the car? Give a thought to your childhood, assuming you are old enough to have spent a childhood free from screen time (yes, that was a thing).

My childhood, outside of the car, was spent exploring the neighborhood with kids from across the street. All of us endowed with terrible nicknames such as Freckled Faced Annie and Big Fat Jo, I even hesitate to type them; we did persevere into adulthood in spite of the occasional ill will of others. However…


Many parents are familiar with the quote, “Please be patient, I’m a work in progress” as it relates to children, but seldom do we contemplate that adults are also a work in progress, especially as parents. Once you gaze into those bright eyes and caress those tiny fingers you have started down your own uncharted path as a parent and each day you learn something new about yourself, your child and your relationships. Parenting is an action that can never truly be mastered and requires the individual to recognize that they too are growing. That can be a scary realization…


Many traditional educational settings, and adults, view discipline as something that comes from external sources and is imposed upon an individual.

Young children are capable of calm and concentration.

Montessorians believe that discipline comes from within the individual and that it is born from meaningful experiences carried out in a well planned environment (for classroom discipline and management). Hand-in-hand with discipline comes normalization.

Normalization is a key concept in the Montessori Method and is truly what the adult seeks to help each child achieve so that they may continue down an obstacle free path and develop their mind and personality as intended by nature. This is a transformation…


Over the years I have become a very vocal advocate for the independence of children. I believe, within reason, they should be allowed independence to care for themselves (feeding, dressing, cleaning), their environment and others. This is not to say that they have the life experience or abstract reasoning to tackle every single issue that arises; crossing the street is something that needs to be taught and can’t be learned by mere trial and error. There are, though, other instances in life where

A new food can be all the motivation a child needs to feed themselves, even 1 year olds are capable of using utensils unassisted.

exploration and gumption can help a child better understand themselves and their world.

I have been a…


“The basis of the reform of education and society which is a necessity of our times must be built upon the scientific study of Man the Unknown”. (Dr.Maria Montessori, Clio Press, The Formation of Man ,p 9) Can we ever know ourselves fully? As social beings we crave communication, collaboration and an environment to share our ideas, our very essence, desiring at times to leave a permanent legacy to humanity. Maria Montessori herself was not immune from human tendencies. Although she did not expound on them directly they can be extrapolated from her writings. …

Emily Canibano, M.ed

Health and Wellness Professional | Early Childhood Development and Education Specialist | Birth, Parenting and Breastfeeding Expert

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