Connect with your sense of space with help from these videos of sound art from around the world

11 Sound Installations You Can Experience at Home, Contemporary Sound Art
11 Sound Installations You Can Experience at Home, Contemporary Sound Art

The closure of galleries and art spaces around the world makes it difficult for sound art followers to experience sound installation art. But, thanks to the diffuse archive of sound art available online and the medium of video, it’s certainly not impossible.

Indeed, many people in quarantine are turning to sound online to bring the outside world into their homes.

So, here are 11 compelling videos of sound installations to help you enjoy from home the sense of space and experience sound…


With the world in lockdown, millions online turn to the sounds of rainforests, rivers and oceans

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Credit: Nate Jonhston, Unsplash

A world in quarantine is listening online to natural soundscapes, amid global restrictions on local and international travel. For sound artists, the trend not only confirms something they’ve long known about the nature of sound, but it also gives them new insights into wider society’s relationship with sound.

The fight against the spread of Covid-19 has meant one-third of Earth’s human population being put under lockdown. Public parks and beaches around the world have been closed and flights have been cancelled.

But since lockdown…


Are we (really) a generation of ghosters?

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A friend of mine — a really good old friend — recently moved nearby. We’re living within minutes of each other for the first time since we were 18. It’s great — it really is.

Well, okay. We’ve seen each other once since he moved here. And it’s been around a year. Actually, you know what — I’m yet to reply to a message he sent me. Something about going to the pub next week. I had read it around midnight, some night, recently. Let’s see when… eight days ago.

All’s well. It’s the next day now and my friend…


Rebecca Horn’s ‘Ballet of the Woodpeckers’ (1986) at Tate Modern, London

Rebecca Horn, ‘Ballet of the Woodpeckers’ (1986)
Rebecca Horn, ‘Ballet of the Woodpeckers’ (1986)
Rebecca Horn, ‘Ballet of the Woodpeckers’ (1986)

The installation you’re reading about

‘Ballet of the Woodpeckers’ (1986) by Rebecca Horn — currently (early 2020) on display at the Tate Modern in London. The installation is in the Tate’s Blavatnik building, featured within a mini exhibition of Rebecca Horn’s work.

What it’s like to experience

Immersive — in an eerie way.

Eight large mirrors form a three-sided square in a space within the Blavatnik basement. Around the mirrors are 19 electronically controlled hammers — two to three hammers per mirror.

Each hammer strikes its mirror every 13 seconds before slowly winding back and pausing. They each strike…


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Artists and art experts in London, the UK’s biggest art hub, are actively seeking ways of incorporating blockchain into the sale of artworks.

The UK has been touted as a potential pioneer of blockchain technology, but now artists in its biggest city are beginning to explore ways of solving provenance issues, such as authenticity fraud, which have a long history in the industry.

Artists believe blockchain holds tremendous promise for the industry as a viable means of maintaining transparency in artwork sales and ending the problem of artwork forgery.

“[Blockchain] will benefit and liberate the arts industry in many ways…


Susan Philipsz’s I See a Darkness is new Tate Modern sound installation

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Susan Philipsz, ‘I See a Darkness’

The artwork this article is about

A sound installation called I See a Darkness in Tate Modern, London, UK. It’s located in ‘The Tanks’ on Level 0 of the Blavatnik building. The installation occupies one of the three large rooms of ‘The Tanks’ and opened late December 2018.

What it’s like to experience

Immersive in an ethereal way. Seven speakers surround you in a large industrial chamber, which is in pretty much total darkness save for a sparse scattering of nine LED lights (actually, more light comes from the open doorway to the chamber than is produced by the…


How political events inspired this filmmaker to craft her voice

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There’s never been a project that’s felt so important that we need to make it right away, until this one. This is the project. And I’m so happy it is. It’s got the strongest voice and strongest moral compass. And I really believe in the protagonist as well — she’s incredible and I can’t wait to tell her story.”

Says Cassandra Virdee, London filmmaker and set designer. Cassandra is talking about her new short film 51 States, a project which she is now 18 months into making, and which is…


How determination helped this couturier create a viable alternative to fast fashion

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“I create clothes. That’s what I love doing — it’s kind of my calling. And when you do it in the way I do it, it’s a beautiful thing. It’s a real craft. I think the world is asking for more and more of that now as well. People like to know where things come from and how they’re made.”

You’re sitting in the Bloomsbury atelier of Lucy Tammam, a couturier and artist who specialises in bespoke, fair trade and ethical fashion design. …


How an unexpected dead-end allowed this artist to embrace his true self

“Sometimes, artists feel like other artists are their competitors — it’s not true. You are your only competitor. You compete against yourself.”

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Photograph: Michael Wayne Plant

Says artist, Lorenzo Belenguer. It doesn’t take long for him to get into the nitty-gritty of what it means to be an artist, just as we begin our conversation at his Notting Hill flat, which doubles up as his showroom.

I look around. Lorenzo’s art encompasses sculpture, drawing, and painting. He describes his work as minimalist, and as informed by Arte Povera. Art historian Susie Hodge…


But something else made Ryoji Ikeda’s Barbican Hall performance particularly exciting for sound art

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A minimalist assemblage of sound stripped down to bare sine tones, pops and glitches combines with a data-inspired, black and white digital video—this is the type of audiovisual art for which Ryoji Ikeda, a Japanese artist who lives in Paris, has gathered a kind of cult following. To visit one of his installations or performances is to experience a real spectacle, which is why Barbican made an instant sale upon me seeing a cleverly targeted ad for 30 September 2018’s “Ryoji Ikeda Music for percussion +…

Oli Gudgeon

Writer covering topics in sound art and sound installation art.

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