How, and why, Instagram, Pinterest, Google & Co. aim to make on-platform shopping possible.

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If it were up to the people in charge of the world’s largest platforms, the entire internet will soon be “shoppable.” In the past year, all the major players have introduced formats, where users are able to make purchases right in the ad creatives themselves — even if they aren’t in an online shop. OMR breaks down which platforms have released “shoppable” ads, which companies are the most advanced and what factors are propelling the trend.

Player number 1: Instagram (Facebook)


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Following the lead of other legit advertisers, Danish politician Joachim B. Olsen places banners where exposure is high

“Yeah, I’m the guy from Pornhub,” posted Joachim B. Olsen just a few days ago to his Facebook page. But you will not find the Danish politician acting in any videos on the erotic platform, but rather stumping for votes on banners. And Olsen is hardly the first to plug issues that matter where others are looking for girls with issues. In addition to other politicians, serious brands have also begun running ads on adult websites. OMR breaks down the trend, sheds light on the background and shows examples of the original ads.


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Not actual profits crashing.

When it comes to maintaining visibility for brands and merchants active on Amazon, purchasing ads is a must. But not only has the price of those ads steadily gone up, but now there is a brand new nightmare for brands: the eCommerce behemoth recently ran tests, in which users click an ad (which has been paid for by brands and merchants) and are shown a similar, but more inexpensive product–oftentimes from Amazon’s own brands. It’s the latest in a host of hostile actions by Amazon towards resident merchants.

The original post can be seen here: https://www.linkedin.com/embed/feed/update/urn:li:ugcPost:6503850255161794560

Nearly 75,000 impressions, 642 likes and 333 comments in just over two days: posted by US-Amazon expert Izzy Benoliel on Linkedin, the video shows a user of the US version of the app searching for dietary supplement brand “Nested Naturals.” They then click on an ad for a Nested Naturals product on the search results page. The user is then redirected to the Nested Natural product page, but then a layer immediately pops up plugging a product by “Amazon Elements,” Amazon’s own generic brand. The headline: “similar articles, lower price.” The Amazon product is almost 50% cheaper than the “Nested Naturals” original. There’s a yellow button promising to show further details and presumably leads to the Amazon Elements page, even though we do not see the redirect in action. …


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The latest darling alternative currency has been called the new PayPal, an ingenious growth hack and a blatant pyramid scheme. (Illustration: Juliya Avetisyan / OMR)

“Initiative Q is an attempt by ex-PayPal guys to create a new payment system — There’s nothing to lose but if this payment system becomes a world leading payment method your Qs can be worth a lot.” That’s the abridged opener spreading like wildfire across social media. 2 million people have already joined the fray (according to the company’s own figures); the majority of which have done so in the past two weeks — although it’s been around for 6 months. …


Is there a bigger boost to a brand’s reputation and popularity than throngs of customers queuing up around the block just to have a chance at getting their hands on its latest merch? The fashion and lifestyle industry has perfected the practice with the “drop.” While its roots lie in the sneaker and streetwear scene, the tactic is now employed by upscale fashion labels and even made its way online. OMR breaks it down, how it works, its marketing raison d’etre and its excesses.

Stroll down Lafayette Street on a given Thursday in New York’s hipster Mecca Soho and you are likely to see throngs of people lined up, literally around the block, waiting to get inside the Supreme store. The same scene plays out seemingly every week: young people clamoring for the latest “drop,” i.e. the sales start for the streetwear label’s latest offering. New releases typically sell out immediately, and restocks to the inventory are limited and released without fanfare. The “drop” strategy figures to have played a significant role in Supreme’s evolution into a billion-dollar enterprise after a minority acquisition by a private equity company. …


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“Websta”, “Pikbee”, “Webstagram” and “Instahu” monetize massive reach via Google Adsense (GIF by Gastanuke)

The KPIs are of course killer: 7.5 million, 3.4 million and 2.8 million impressions. Pages that do nothing more than steal and publish entire chunks of Instagram content to their own sites — including pics, descriptions, hashtags, comments and likes. A look at where the traffic comes from and how exactly the sites are able to monetize their reach.

With over a billion active users per month, Instagram is one of — if not the — hottest platform around. Countless bits of content are uploaded by users around the world every second — and it’s not just Insta and parent company Facebook that stand to profit. The Internet is inundated with thousands of sites that scrape the image platform to rip off and republish the content to their own sites. In the past weeks and months, a few of these second-hand publishers have seen their traffic absolutely explode. …


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Thomas Derksen carved out a following in China with sketch videos — now he’s advertising for top European brands

Approximately EUR 15.8 billion in market volume, influencer training camps and virtual influencers. The Chinese influencer-marketing sector is an eclectic mix of the bizarre and the massive. The industry not only dwarfs the next three largest markets combined, but has also been in existence much longer. Today we are taking a closer look at the Middle Kingdom, its influencer market and how one typical German made an atypical splash on the Chinese influencer marketing scene.

In China, Silicon Valley pales in importance to Beijing’s tech hub, Zhongguancun. With active internet users (802 million) exceeding the combined populations of the United States, Brazil and Indonesia, China has the world’s largest social media market, so there is simply no need to look west. And in China, the influencer industry is exploding.
Whereas the industry in Europe’s DACH region (Germany, Austria and Switzerland) is estimated to have generated approximately EUR 506 million, the revenue generated on the Chinese influencer market is a whopping EUR 15.8 billion — i.e. 30 times more. …


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Ruler of the Internet taking to promoting its own generic product line—right next to name brands

Sellers complain about listings being co-opted

“What would you do if your competitor had a SINGLE product that showed up TWELVE times on the first search results page of Amazon?,” Benoliel said of the discovery. “Well Amazon has just done that with their own brands. Amazon has taken the next step in their #brandstakeover and is now testing including a link to their private label product on almost every first page search result!,” Benoliel continued in his post on which he pointedly used the hashtag #AmazonWarOnBrands.

On the Amazon seller forum one user talks about a similar experience, also corroborating it with a screenshot. His product listing, too, received an unwarranted addendum redirect potential customers to a similar Amazon product. …


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“VVS Hunter”: A mobile side-scroller that held the number 1 spot for a week in Germany

German hip-hop. Not something your standard Yank, Brit or Aussi generally takes note of. But when it comes to promotion, there are some lessons to be learned stateside from German MCs. The latest example: Berlin Rapper Ufo361 drops a game to promote his latest album VVS. It’s a side-scrolling masterclass in promotion, brand building, shoutouts and cross-platform integration.

You really don’t

“You know what got me crazy bro?”
“What’s that?”
“You know at the end of most of they songs how they add all that promotional stuff, they sales? How often do you see that here?” “I mean, you really don’t.”

“You really don’t.”


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The cush IT job at a employment company Monster soon became a drag for Thomas Panke. Serendipitously, he discovers the potential of retail sales with Lego and opens up a brick-and-mortar shop close to his flat in Frankfurt, Germany. He calls it “Held der Steine” (which loosely translates as “Brick Hero” and comes from the name of the individual Lego pieces.) Shortly thereafter, he launches a YouTube channel, but it struggles to get into overdrive — until he hits the right nerve with his scathing review of a Lego tow truck model last November. Now his rants generate reach and followers. …

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OMR

Everyone knows (eventually) which companies are successful. We report on the marketing strategies that pushed these companies and brands to the top on OMR.com.

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