On populism

Globalization was fiercely promoted for its purported benefits to people by professors of economics, poshly-educated politicians, and ‘respectable’ newspapers all over the world. The ‘masses’, after careful consideration of the arguments of those ‘experts’ and painstaking deliberation on the subject, voted in office those politicians who were going to bring those benefits to society. The ‘masses’ were wise. They could be trusted to vote for the right thing. Democracy worked splendidly in approving the rational argument of the ‘experts’. This was, at least, the story that professors of economics, poshly-educated politicians, and ‘respectable’ newspapers peddled.

Professors of economics, poshly-educated politicians, and ‘respectable’ newspapers now tell us that the rejection of the failed globalization experiment is an irrational, unscientific, and self-destructing movement. The ‘masses’ have suddenly forgotten how to carefully consider arguments and deliberate. The ‘masses’ are very unwise. ‘Our democracy’ is broken. Whoever is against what the ‘experts’ say is deluded. ‘Beware of the populists!’

Considering what ‘anti-populist’ ‘experts’ now call populism, the doctrine of globalization used to be the most successful type of populism — dressed up in the mantle of ‘science’, ‘rationality’, ‘inevitability’, and ‘expertise’ of a so-called ‘elite’. (Now, why such a bunch of incompetents would be called an ‘elite’ beats me.) ‘Mea culpa’, they said (they speak Latin). ‘Shit happens, you know.’ Well, shit happens indeed.


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