Can randomness be considered an expected trend signal?

“No one knows the future” ― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

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“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” ― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Future… All of us want to know what’s going to be in the future? We may have some predictions according to the latest researches, experiences, studies, needs, political-social-economic news etc. But here goes the game-cheater; randomness. In the every field of our lives; professional, personal, hard-core practice or theory related assignments.

So how to manage unexpected randomness? Can we know when and why it pops up? Maybe this question’s answer is highly fancied by stock brokers, but aren’t we all stock brokers when it comes to these moments of truth?

If we look at the other bottom line, randomness occurs at the times when there is lack of bias and correlation, but these times we call as irregularities are actually quite expected and readable while they are closing.

Random trends, such as unpredictable technological devices-which we have never known that we have a consumer need for those devices-or like a person, on TV, who talks things that against common sense and suddenly everybody takes into account that ideas etc. Those surprises are all after some form of fuzziness, invisible crisis' and ‘supersaturated’ status-quo needs. The real question is, perhaps; when the status - quo gets bored and wants a change? Well, when the old one is quite overdue, it gives signals. Signals can be slow or too stabile success fluctuations. I want to give the example of Facebook.

Before it is enterprised, there was a sector giant; Myspace. Myspace was answering the needs and also making user- friendly changes and improvements, profits were on the affirmative slope but like a cloudy weather before rain, there was no excitement. It is hard to explain but there was a need, a big change or a new player.

Therefore, yes; randomness can be algorithmized and it is a pattern. Economists are already trying to respond this unknown area with the Game Theory, but Game Theory is a research about choosing the favored possibility that is already on the table. Randomness is the card that is waiting under the table and making us probe when and how it is going to show up. We cannot know what form it turns into but we can know its time. It is both science and art. Science of a new trend can be speculated feasibly with the right tools but soft part, art part, gives a huge place of creativity, opportunities. Yet again, how can we see these advantages when we follow these steps through our end goal of the challenges in practical life, even in the workplace? I want to give credit to post-modern romantics and say the only constants we can hold on in this chaos are hope and luck. However, this passive approach would take us from creativity with too much hesitation about strategizing and losing so much time.

We need to give voice to our instincts and sometimes should not be afraid of taking action based on these magical notifiers. I want to recommend the book of Shaun Smith and Andy Millgan; See, Feel, Think, Do: The power of instinct in business.

Sometimes our career choices could lead us to be responsible of executing totally different business models. For instance a person changes his or her job from A startup company to B startup company, but challenges vary even in the very similar tasks, if this example is, let’s say, from Uber to Linkedin. This is the randomness nature of profession dilemmas, I would call. When this person leaves the prior startup in the formation, he or she can face the growth phase of the new one in addition to its whole new business model. Change brings unknowns and randomness wildcard. Keeping the eye open for the signals and trusting on the educated instincts can help us look around for new players and trends before they become the part of our life. Hints are like inspirations, they can be found anywhere; an expat fair, in a small audienced webinar, or even in the workplace rumors.

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