What Great Salespeople Do

“People who tell the stories rule the world.”- Michael Bosworth

Storytelling is one of the best ways we communicate as humans. It is a method of communication that we have used for thousands of years even before we could write and that has not been utilized to its potential by our society. “What Great Salespeople Do” focuses on exactly that, how we can combine storytelling and sales to have a greater impact in our business. It talks about how to get beyond that initial resistance with customers and connect with them to make any sale possible. This is a good book for anyone starting in the world of sales. It is not 100% captivating but it has very interesting points that will surely help any business man have smoother transactions. The authors of this book are Michael Bosworth and Ben Zoldan. Bosworth is a bestselling author, keynote speaker and expert in sales. Zoldan is also a bestselling author and a authority in the field of story telling.

Humanize

In this day and age sales has turned into something that is almost a robotic process. It has become so bad that the word salesman has developed into a negative connotation. The problem is that the process has become so automated that people don´t feel like they can identify with the sales person anymore. This makes it hard for customers to want to stop and open up to the salesperson at a store about his or her real needs. This is where the experience needs to be humanized. This means using empathy, vulnerability, and compassion. Tearing up “the script” for a couple of minutes and really opening yourself up to the other person. This in the long run will increase your sales and also help you make a friend or two on the way.

Story

Focusing on the story is probably the single most important factor other than the product itself that you are selling. The story is the part in the communication where we really get to connect with the other person. It gets away from all the facts and focuses on the emotions which is what makes right side of our brain to start working. Stories are also a great place for us to be vulnerable with the other person. There are five main parts to a story. 1. What is the point? Clarify what you are trying to get across. 2. The setting, who, what, and where. 3. The obstacles and challenges that came up. 4. The turning point, what as the key decision, event or action. 5. The resolution or how it turned it out. These are the critical parts to have clear while telling a story to a customer as without one the other person will feel lost.

Conclusion

Selling is a crucial aspect of any interaction. Even though your are not a salesman everyone is selling all the time. You are selling your brand, your ideas, your way of thinking and who you are to other people. Personally I came across this book as I was told by a mentor that most entrepreneurs today don’t know about sales and that is why they fail. This book has been an eye opener. I recommend it to anyone looking to improve in business and even generally in life. This is a good book to begin on the subject of selling. It will show you possibilities that you maybe have been ignoring and that in the end would be very beneficial to you.

Action Steps

  1. Tell more stories. Choose five people that you know and with each one start with “Let me tell you a story…” this will naturally open people up to what you are about to say. The story you tell can be about anything, what you did last weekend or something about work. The goal is for you to start practicing so that you can tell more stories naturally.
  2. Write a sketch of your company, non profit or of yourself using the different parts of the story. When talking about your business with others or when your making a pitch use these parts to connect in a superior way with your audience. This will give them a better understanding of where you’re coming from and what you are trying to say.
Michael Bosworth’s TEDx Talk on Stories

Suggested Further Reading on Sales: Sell or Be Sold: How to get your way in Business or in Life by Grant Cardone

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