3 Quick Tips About Code for Beginners

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1. Find helpful resources

You don’t have to know what everything means at first. When I first started coding, I probably knew what 20% of the code I was typing actually meant. I literally taught myself to code by copying other people’s code off of Github and then examining it to figure out why it worked. This is called “reverse engineering”. With coding becoming so popular, you can usually just throw in a section of your code that you don’t understand into Google and you will be on track to figuring out what it means. Stack Overflow is an excellent resource for coding help as well. If you prefer the more instructional/classroom type of learning, there are great resources out there for that as well. Checkout: Treehouse, Codecademy, and Code Avengers just to name a few.

2. Use a good code editor

For the first year or so that I was learning to code, I was using the text editor, Text Wrangler. I was so focused on the code that I had no idea about how bad Text Wrangler sucked for coding.

The day that I saw people mentioning Sublime Text, I checked it out and it completely changed the way I code. Sublime Text offers many unique features like syntax highlighting (syntax is basically “code structure” & every language has it’s own syntax), autocomplete (start typing an element and hit the ‘Tab’ key to complete the closing element, and a package manager (plugins for Sublime Text that are custom built and allow for more features).

3. Explore frameworks

This is another piece of heaven that I was late on finding. HTML and CSS frameworks are basically files you can download that give you a huge head start on your project. An example of a framework, and one that I started out using is Bootstrap. Bootstrap offers a huge advantage for beginners considering the fact that they offer just about every HTML element you will need for a basic website. You also get some custom JavaScript components as well.

Other frameworks you might check out are: Foundation, HTML5 Boilerplate, HTML Kickstart, and Toast.

The most important thing of all is to always keep learning and building new things.

If this article helped in any way possible, please scroll down and either click that Recommend button or buy me a coffee (payy.me/parker).

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