Co-authored article with: Marco Agner.

This article is an organized write-up of notes and insights collected during the on-going research we are doing on the subject of accessible wallets. Even though there’s still much to be done, we wanted to share these first thoughts since now.

There exists, already, a general awareness of the importance of creating interfaces with good Usability for Bitcoin users. It’s a very straightforward issue: if interfaces are hard to use — i.e. have a bad usability — people will make more mistakes when operating the wallet. Mistakes in Bitcoin wallets can manifest themselves as irreversible…


Following up the last two articles on Bitcoin usability, we’re going to approach the vast topic of wallets focusing on the advantages and disadvantages perceived in each described type in terms of usability.

Since wallet software is the main medium with which the regular user interacts when managing his bitcoins, it’s also one of the main places where mistakes can happen and attack vectors are explored. …


In the first article of this series, I’ve presented the concepts of mental models and metaphors, as used in the field of Design, and how they could influence people’s understanding of certain aspects of Bitcoin. The accuracy of this understanding would, consequently, have an impact on Bitcoin’s usability because it defines whether people found it easy or not to use.

Now, my focus will shift from design concepts applied to Bitcoin to an element of the Bitcoin environment that has had an important role in improving the system so we could get to the current level of usability. …


“Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to
use.”

From Nielsen Norman Group.

The context

Bitcoin, as a software or protocol, is meant to be used by people and, therefore, should have its design as a relevant aspect to be developed.

Proper usability is one of the key elements to facilitate the portion of
user security and privacy that depends on how good is the interaction between the user and the software, especially, but not exclusively, to non-technical users. It makes Bitcoin more comprehensible, as well as offers the best options for action. …


Part 2: Learning in Practice What NOT to do with your Users

Picture by: Julian Fong

In the first part of this article, I showed you how changing our consumption paradigms in the beginning of the twentieth century has influenced the way we present products and services. The UX design of today reflects the concepts of this new form of propaganda, which means establishing a connection between products and feelings/sensations. This approach can make your design stand out by offering a good experience to the user and harvesting good results for the business. Or, it can be used to manipulate and confuse the user…


Part 1: How brands might be manipulating your choices

This article will be published in two parts.

The first part will be a small historic revision of how propaganda paradigms went from the rational choice for a needed and useful product to the emotional appeal to consumer’s subconscious. And, of course, how these new paradigms were incorporated into Design, especially what we call today User Experience. To guide my thoughts, I’ll base myself on a BBC Documentary called The Century of the Self (Adam Curtis, 2002).

The second part of the article will be a study with real life examples…


Como as opções padrão de um serviço podem afetar fortemente a segurança dos usuários

Na última semana, o serviço de compartilhamento de documentos da Microsoft, o Docs.com, fez sucesso nas notícias como mais um caso de vazamento de informações de usuários. A novidade aqui é que eles não foram hackeados; a exposição dos documentos deveria ser apenas uma característica do serviço. Mas, então, por que várias pessoas foram pegas de surpresa ao descobrirem que seus documentos privados com informações altamente sensíveis estavam disponíveis para uma busca no Google? Uma dica: o problema foi de usabilidade.

Sobre a opção padrão


Learning in Practice What NOT to do with your Users

Picture by: Julian Fong

LINK TO PART 1: https://medium.com/interactive-mind/the-dark-side-of-ux-design-part-1-ec94b305fca6#.p8w1q8v61

In the first part of this article, I showed you how changing our consumption paradigms in the beginning of the twentieth century has influenced the way we present products and services. The UX design of today reflects the concepts of this new form of propaganda, which means establishing a connection between products and feelings/sensations. This approach can make your design stand out by offering a good experience to the user and harvesting good results for the business. Or, it can be used to manipulate and confuse the user, tricking him into making decisions that benefit…


Entenda a relevância de uma boa usabilidade para a segurança dos usuários.

A Usabilidade é um atributo qualitativo que estima o quão fácil uma interface é de se usar.

Definição do Nielsen Norman Group.

Usabilidade? Interface? Se eu estou falando de conceitos de design, o que isso poderia ter a ver com segurança? Tudo.

O que quero mostrar aqui ao longo deste texto é exatamente a forte ligação (até mesmo dependência, em muitos casos) entre usabilidade de um sistema/produto e a segurança para os seus usuários. Como objeto de estudo, usarei o Bitcoin: uma tecnologia nova, disruptiva, assustadora para muitas pessoas que não o entendem e que mexe com valores financeiros. …


How brands might be manipulating your choices

This article will be published in two parts.

The first part will be a small historic revision of how propaganda paradigms went from the rational choice for a needed and useful product to the emotional appeal to consumer’s subconscious. And, of course, how these new paradigms were incorporated into Design, especially what we call today User Experience. To guide my thoughts, I’ll base myself on a BBC Documentary called The Century of the Self (Adam Curtis, 2002).

The second part of the article will be a study with real life examples of manipulative and purposely confusing design patterns used to…

Patrícia Estevão

UX Designer and Consultant

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